The Hermit of 69th Street: The Working Papers of Norbert Kosky

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Kensington Publishing Corporation, 1991 - Fiction - 635 pages
4 Reviews

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Review: The Hermit of 69th Street: The Working Papers of Norbert Kosky

User Review  - Jason Miller - Goodreads

Being a fan of Kosinski this was an obvious must read. It was too slow and it never engaged me. Read full review

Review: The Hermit of 69th Street: The Working Papers of Norbert Kosky

User Review  - Stuart - Goodreads

Virtually unreadable, but I'm giving it 5 stars as the most audacious literary feat in history, and for its multiple rewritings, even as the author chose death. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
9
Section 4
29
Section 5
61
Section 6
99
Section 7
101
Section 8
129
Section 25
408
Section 26
409
Section 27
439
Section 28
441
Section 29
459
Section 30
469
Section 31
481
Section 32
492

Section 9
145
Section 10
180
Section 11
181
Section 12
197
Section 13
199
Section 14
227
Section 15
271
Section 16
279
Section 17
293
Section 18
310
Section 19
311
Section 20
321
Section 21
351
Section 22
355
Section 23
367
Section 24
377
Section 33
493
Section 34
507
Section 35
513
Section 36
532
Section 37
533
Section 38
545
Section 39
573
Section 40
575
Section 41
585
Section 42
589
Section 43
591
Section 44
601
Section 45
617
Section 46
636
Copyright

About the author (1991)

Jerzy Kosinski, 1933 - 1991 Novelist Jerzy Kosinski was born June 8, 1933, in Poland to Russian parents who had fled the Revolution. In 1939, he was separated from his family when the Nazi's invaded, and he wandered through villages for six years, surviving by his wits. In shock, he remained mute from the age of nine to fourteen. He was finally reunited with his family and attains a professorship at the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. In 1957, Kosinski arrived in New York with his Polish passport, little money and a cyanide capsule after creating four fictional professors who recommend him for a nonexistent foundation grant. He learned to speak fluent English in four months and within a year, had begun work on a study of the collective mentality called "The Future is Ours, Comrade." He published this under the pen name Joseph Novak and had his writing recommended to him by fellow students at Columbia University. He won the National Book Award for the novel "Steps" and his other novels include "Being There, "The Devil Tree," "Cockpit," and "Blind Date." "Blind Date" tells the story of the Manson killings, which is where Kosinski would have been, with his friends on Cielo Drive in Los Angeles, if he had not been stuck in JFK Airport dealing with mis-tagged luggage. He writes about the killings not because they were his friends, but to show how unpredictable life is. In 1968, after six years of marriage, his wife Mary died of brain cancer. He committed suicide on May 3, 1991 at the age of 58.

Bibliographic information