A Sanctuary of Trees: Beechnuts, Birdsongs, Baseball Bats, and Benedictions (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Chelsea Green Publishing, Apr 10, 2012 - Nature - 248 pages
5 Reviews

As author Gene Logsdon puts it, "We are all tree huggers." But not just for sentimental or even environmental reasons. Humans have always depended on trees for our food, shelter, livelihood, and safety. In many ways, despite the Grimm's fairy-tale version of the dark, menacing forest, most people still hold a deep cultural love of woodland settings, and feel right at home in the woods.

In this latest book, A Sanctuary of Trees, Logsdon offers a loving tribute to the woods, tracing the roots of his own home groves in Ohio back to the Native Americans and revealing his own history and experiences living in many locations, each of which was different, yet inextricably linked with trees and the natural world. Whether as an adolescent studying at a seminary or as a journalist living just outside Philadelphia's city limits, Gene has always lived and worked close to the woods, and his curiosity and keen sense of observation have taught him valuable lessons about a wide variety of trees: their distinct characteristics and the multiple benefits and uses they have.

In addition to imparting many fascinating practical details of woods wisdom, A Sanctuary of Trees is infused with a philosophy and descriptive lyricism that is born from the author's passionate and lifelong relationship with nature: There is a point at which the tree shudders before it begins its descent. Then slowly it tips, picks up speed, often with a kind of wailing death cry from rending wood fibers, and hits the ground with a whump that literally shakes the earth underfoot. The air, in the aftermath, seems to shimmy and shiver, as if saturated with static electricity. Then follows an eerie silence, the absolute end to a very long life.

Fitting squarely into the long and proud tradition of American nature writing, A Sanctuary of Trees also reflects Gene Logsdon's unique personality and perspective, which have marked him over the course of his two dozen previous books as the authentic voice of rural life and traditions.

  

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Review: A Sanctuary of Trees

User Review  - Alexis - Goodreads

A well-chosen title. I enjoyed the autobiographical beginning and its descriptions of how he slowly realized how important trees and nature were in his life. It was a bit like hearing someone share ... Read full review

Review: A Sanctuary of Trees

User Review  - Janice - Goodreads

Gene Logsdon is a first-rate writer about his personal life experience living amongst groves of so many different trees and his usage and conservation of them, very interesting. Read full review

Contents

Discovering Tranquility
1
Babes in the Woods
15
Going to School in the Forest
27
Woodcutting Days
45
Beginning a Life in the Woods
54
Suburban Wildwood
67
Our Own Sanctuary at Last
91
The Creekside Grove
105
12
142
The Dark Side of the Woods
151
Your Own LowCost Wood Products
160
The Living Architecture of a Tree
171
Practical Wildwood Food
176
Jewels in Wood
195
Starting a Grove from Scratch
203
Keeping the Sanctuary Lamps Burning
214

The Flowering of Our Woodlands
115
Naming the Trees
125
How Big a Woodlot for Fuel Independence?
133

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About the author (2012)

A prolific nonfiction writer, novelist, and journalist, Gene Logsdon has published more than two dozen books, both practical and philosophical. Gene’s nonfiction works include Holy Shit, Small-Scale Grain Raising, Living at Nature’s Pace, The Contrary Farmer's Invitation to Gardening, Good Spirits, and The Contrary Farmer. His most recent novel is Pope Mary and the Church of Almighty Good Food. He writes a popular blog, The Contrary Farmer, as well as an award-winning column for the Carey Ohio Progressor Times, and is a regular contributor to Farming Magazine and Draft Horse Journal. He lives and farms in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. You can visit his blog at http://thecontraryfarmer.wordpress.com/.

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