Eden

Front Cover
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1989 - Fiction - 262 pages
35 Reviews
A crew of six crash-land on Eden, fourth planet from another sun. They set forth into a strange world that grows ever stranger. The sun is not completely circular. The desert ground is soft, spongy, it exudes acrid vapors. Thickets of plants are shaped like hanging spiders; trees, violet and blue, breathe noisily; flower petals lift into the air like a flock of startled pigeons. The men come to a wall that moves in rhythmic waves; they enter an automated factory where mysterious objects are created, destroyed, and created again in a meaningless cycle. They meet an inhabitant of Eden, a large, humped, pearl-colored, naked torso from which protrudes another, smaller torso with a child's head and two small arms -- a "doubler," they call him. One doubler leads to another, to whole communities, to a world of flying saucers and genetic engineering. And everywhere, death. Swollen bodies in ditches and in wells, a beehive structure filled with clusters of glass eggs -- a skeleton within each egg.

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Review: Eden

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

One of those rare science-fiction stories that accurately portrays aliens as truly 'alien'. Viewed through the perspective of the explorer crew, without explanation, the activities and mentality of ... Read full review

Review: Eden

User Review  - Al Sirois - Goodreads

A typically well-written book from Lem, EDEN is the story of a exploratory expedition to Eden, a world inhabited by intelligent aliens. The humans' rocket crashes upon landing, so part of the ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
20
Section 3
51
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Polish science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem was born on September 12, 1921. A medical graduate of Cracow University, he is at home both in the sciences and in philosophy, and this broad erudition gives his writings genuine depth. He has published extensively, not only fiction, but also theoretical studies. His books have been translated into 41 languages and sold over 27 million copies. He gained international acclaim for The Cyberiad, a series of short stories, which was first published in 1974. A trend toward increasingly serious philosophical speculation is found in his later works, such as Solaris (1961), which was made into a Soviet film by Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky in 1972 and remade by Steven Soderbergh in 2002. He died on March 27, 2006 in Krakow at the age of 84.

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