Travels in Greece and Turkey: Undertaken by Order of Louis XVI, and with the Authority of the Ottoman Court, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
T. N. Longman & O. Rees, 1801 - Greece
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - ... he is capable of executing great things ; he speaks with ease, he expresses himself with warmth ; he is acquainted with the language of the passions, and he likewise astonishes by his natural eloquence ; he loves the arts, without daring to cultivate them, under the brazen yoke which hangs heavy on his neck ; skilful and cunning in trade, he does not always conduct himself in it with that frankness which constitutes its principal basis ; and...
Page 7 - ... we still find in modern Greece many of the fine qualities which do honour to the history of ancient Greece, it cannot be denied, that superstition, the child of ignorance and slavery, greatly tarnishes their lustre ; and we also discover in their disposition that fickleness, that pliability, that want of sincerity, in short, that artful turn of mind which borders on treachery...
Page 7 - ... of his inclinations. The man of these charming parts of Greece is of a handsome stature; he carries his head high, his body erect, or rather inclined backward than forward; he is dignified in his carriage, easy in his manners, and nimble in his gait: his eyes are full of vivacity: his countenance is open, and his address agreeable and prepossessing; he is neat and elegant in his clothing; he has a taste for dress, as for every thing that is beautiful: active, industrious, and even...
Page 187 - Homer, who is reprefented not only the bravefl, but the haudfomeft, of all the Greeks, except Nireus, thus mentioned in the catalogue of the forces. Nireus in faultlefs fhape and blooming grace, The lovelieft youth of all the Grecian race, Pelides only match'd his early charms. . Popes II. ii. 817. * —Matilda rears,] See the notes to book xvii. for an account of this extraordinary woman, here feigned to have prefided over the education ufMtuuiltlo. Th' Egean fea he crofs'd and Grecian lands, 453...
Page 5 - ... and there is, indeed, great reason to think they are a people very capable of improvement, if well governed and better instructed. They are obliged to labour regularly in order to raise the dates, maize, 7 The following is Sonnini's description of the Copt, or native of Egypt : "His person is short and heavy ; his head is big, but empty ; his face is broad and flat ; his complexion sallow and dark ; and his countenance is mean. His disposition is gloomy and melancholy ; sedentary, and without...
Page 8 - ... Greece many of the fine qualities which do honour to the history of ancient Greece, it cannot be denied, that superstition, the child of ignorance and slavery, greatly tarnishes their lustre ; and we also discover in their disposition that fickleness, that pliability, that want of sincerity, in short, that artful turn of mind which borders on treachery, and of which the Greeks of antiquity have been accused.
Page 5 - ... with an abundant moisture. There, we see not those vast, sandy, and arid plains, those naked and heated rocks,- forsaken by nature, and which man does not traverse without considerable difficulty and danger. That frightful nakedness by which habitable Egypt will ever be circumscribed and confined, disfigures not the land of Greece.
Page 4 - I refolved tp fee alfq;the country which may be called the cradle of the graces and of good tafte.
Page i - Travels in Greece and Turkey, undertaken by Order of Louis XVI. and with the Authority of the Ottoman Court.
Page 45 - Porchachi, had taken them from the ancient writers. Not that, in fact, the gold mines were not in the environs of Chrusocco, a village near the gulf of that name, which occupies the place of Acamantis, an ancient town, one of the...

Bibliographic information