Legal Ethics: A Comparative Study

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Stanford University Press, Jan 1, 2004 - Business & Economics - 352 pages
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Examining legal ethics within the framework of modern practice, this book identifies two important ethical issues that all lawyers confront: the difference between the role of lawyers and the role of judges in pursuing justice, and the conflicting responsibilities lawyers have to their clients and to the legal system more broadly. In addressing these issues, Legal Ethics provides an explanation of the duties and dilemmas common to practicing lawyers in modern legal systems throughout the world.

The authors focus their analysis on lawyers in independent practice in modern capitalist constitutional regimes, including the United States, Japan, Europe, and Latin America, as well as the emerging legal systems in China and the former Soviet bloc, to develop connections between the legal profession and political systems based on the rule of law. They find that although ethical tension is inherent in the legal practice of all these societies, the legal profession is essential to stable political institutions.

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Contents

Contents
1
The Rule of Law and the Legal Profession 1 The Social Functions
10
Judges and Lawyers 15 The Roman Heritage 18 Officials
37
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Geoffrey C. Hazard, Jr. is Trustee Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He is the coauthor of The Law and Ethics of Lawyering and The Law of Lawyering. Angelo Dondi is Professor of Civil Procedure at the University of Genoa.

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