Fraser's Magazine, Volume 54 (Google eBook)

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J. Fraser, 1856 - Authors
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Contains the first printing of Sartor resartus, as well as other works by Thomas Carlyle.
  

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Page 325 - Christ, and drink his blood; then we dwell in Christ, and Christ in us; we are one with Christ, and Christ with us...
Page 456 - When daisies pied, and violets blue, And lady-smocks all silver-white, And cuckoo-buds, of yellow hue, Do paint the meadows with delight ; The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men, for thus sings he :Cuckoo ; Cuckoo, cuckoo...
Page 348 - Tho' they may gang a kennin wrang, To step aside is human : One point must still be greatly dark, The moving why they do it: And just as lamely can ye mark, How far perhaps they rue it.
Page 231 - I sit by and sing, Or gather rushes, to make many a ring For thy long fingers; tell thee tales of love; How the pale Phoebe, hunting in a grove, First saw the boy Endymion, from whose eyes She took eternal fire that never dies ; How she...
Page 320 - Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, nor suffer Thy Holy One to see corruption.
Page 357 - And what language is to be expected from him ?—He is a man speaking to men: a man, it is true, endowed with more lively sensibility, more enthusiasm and tenderness, who has a greater knowledge of human nature, and a more comprehensive soul, than are supposed to be common among mankind...
Page 35 - Turn him to any cause of policy, The Gordian knot of it he will unloose, Familiar as his garter: that, when he speaks, The air, a charter'd libertine, is still, And the mute wonder lurketh in men's ears, To steal his sweet and honey'd sentences...
Page 454 - Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale, Thorough flood, thorough fire, I do wander every where, Swifter than the moon's sphere; And I serve the Fairy Queen, To dew her orbs upon the green. The cowslips tall her pensioners be; In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favours, In those freckles live their savours. I must go seek some dewdrops here, And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
Page 333 - Amarantha, sweet and fair, Ah, braid no more that shining hair! As my curious hand or eye Hovering round thee, let it fly. Let it fly as unconfined As its calm ravisher the wind, Who hath left his darling, th' east, To wanton o'er that spicy nest.
Page 157 - Fox and Sheridan, the English Demosthenes and the English Hyperides. There was Burke, ignorant, indeed, or negligent of the art of adapting his reasonings and his style to the capacity and taste of his hearers, but in amplitude of comprehension and richness of imagination superior to every orator, ancient or modern.

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