The Bar Sinister

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Kessinger Publishing, May 1, 2004 - Fiction - 328 pages
1 Review
In his preface, Davis sheds light on the origins of The Bar Sinister. "In the dog world, the original of the bull-terrier in the story is known as Edgewood Cold Steel and to his intimates as 'Kid'. His father was Lord Minto, a thoroughbred bull-terrier, well known in Canada, but the story of Kid's life is that his mother was a black-and-tan named Vic. She was a lady of doubtful pedigree. Among her offspring by Lord Minto, so I have been often informed by many Canadian dog-fanciers, breeders, and exhibitors, was the only white puppy, Kid, in a litter of black-and-tans."

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Review: The Bar Sinister

User Review  - JW - Goodreads

A story about a street dog named "Kid". It is a simple but powerful story and beautifully told from the dog's point of view. I loved this. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Author and journalist Richard Harding Davis was born in Philadelphia on April 18, 1864. After studying at Lehigh and Johns Hopkins universities, he became a reporter and in 1890, he was the managing editor of Harper's Weekly. On assignments, he toured many areas of the world and recorded his impressions of the American West, Europe, and South America in a series of books. As a foreign correspondent, he covered every war from the Greco-Turkish to World War I and published several books recording his experiences. In 1896, he became part of William Randolph Hearst's unproven plot to start the Spanish-American War in order to boost newspaper sales when Hearst sent him and illustrator Frederick Remington to cover the Cuban rebellion against Spanish rule. In Cuba, Davis wrote several articles that sparked U.S. interest in the struggles of the Cuban people, but he resigned when Hearst changed the facts in one of his stories. Davis was aboard the New York during the bombing of Mantanzas, which gave the New York Herald a scoop on the war. As a result, the U.S. Navy prohibited reporters from being aboard any U.S. ships for the rest of the Cuban conflict. Davis was captured by the German Army in 1914 and was threatened with execution as a spy. He eventually convinced them he was a reporter and was released. He is considered one of the most influential reporters of the yellow journalist era. He died in Mount Kisco, New York on April 11, 1916.

In this absorbing volume . . . the greatest Englishman of the twentieth century paints with surpassing elegance his portrait of American history and American character. This is a good book to read-and a book to savor."
--Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.
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--Paul Johnson, author of A History of the American People
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"[The Great Republic] bespeaks not only the author's formidable skills as a historian but also his abiding fondness for-some might say his intimate connection to-the United States. . . . His articles and speeches convey the fullest sense of Winston Churchill's indomitable spirit. . . . In his writing, as in his statesmanship, he was a giant whose height allowed him to see much, much farther than most-even across oceans."
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