Agnosticism (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner sons, 1903 - Agnosticism - 664 pages
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Page 150 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself 'at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Page 286 - Survive not the lamp and the lute, The heart's echoes render No song when the spirit is mute...
Page 28 - ... the inquiry of truth, which is the love-making or wooing of it, the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it, and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature.
Page 440 - But now for many years I cannot endure to read a line of poetry. I have tried lately to read Shakespeare and found it so intolerably dull that it nauseated me.
Page 354 - Thou canst not prove the Nameless, O my son, Nor canst thou prove the world thou movest in, Thou canst not prove that thou art body alone, Nor canst thou prove that thou art spirit alone, Nor canst thou prove that thou art both in one : Thou canst not prove...
Page 153 - ... is carried by habit, upon the appearance of one event, to expect its usual attendant, and to believe that it will exist. This connexion, therefore, which we feel in the mind, this customary transition of the imagination from one object to its usual attendant, is the sentiment or impression from which we form the idea of power or necessary connexion.
Page 611 - As the conditionally limited (which we may briefly call the conditioned) is thus the only possible object of knowledge and of positive thought thought necessarily supposes conditions. To think is to condition ; and conditional limitation is the fundamental law of the possibility of thought.
Page 302 - Nature is always too strong for principle. And though a Pyrrhonian may throw himself or others into a momentary amazement and confusion by his profound reasonings, the first and most trivial event in life will put to flight all his doubts...
Page 440 - I have also said that formerly pictures gave me considerable, and music very great delight. But now for many years I cannot endure to read a line of poetry.
Page 374 - As to the first question, we may observe that what we call a mind is nothing but a heap or collection of different perceptions, united together by certain relations, and supposed, though falsely, to be endowed with a perfect simplicity and identity.

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