Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, May 25, 2008 - Science - 303 pages
2 Reviews
It is said that astronomy is one of the few remaining fields in which amateurs can make a real contribution to science, and nowhere is this more true than in the field of meteors and meteorites. Although meteors are isolated and unpredictable, it is possible to predict when meteor showers - usually associated with old comets - are due; they last a couple of days, during which many meteors can be observed in a single night. Equipment for watching, counting and even measuring meteors can range from the simplest (a chair) to sophisticated all-sky cameras. What is unique about meteors in astronomical observation is that many survive entry into the Earth's atmosphere and impact the ground - the only easily-analysed extraterrestrial material available to science. What is unique about Richard Norton's book is that it is both a field guide to observing meteors, and also a field guide to locating, preparing and analysing meteorites. In addition to giving the reader information about observing techniques for meteors, this book also provides a fully detailed account of the types of meteorites, how and where to find them, how to prepare and analyse them. It is thus the only complete book on the subject available at present.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - T.Rex - LibraryThing

This is, In my opinion, the best book on meteors, metorites etc. The authors explain the subject in detail, describing the various types of meteorites. The volume is copiously illustrated. I you only want one book on the subject, this is it Read full review

Review: Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites

User Review  - Tiago Bruno - Goodreads

A lot of good and new informations about meteorites, their composition, proprieties and more. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Asteroidal Achondrites
120
Differentiated Meteorites Planetary and Lunar Achondrites
134
Martian SNC group
135
ALH 84001
141
Lunar Achondrites
144
Mare Basalts
145
Differentiated Meteorites The Irons
149
IAB Group
151

Meteors
14
Sporadic Meteors
15
Meteor Showers
16
Early Radio Observations of Meteor Showers
18
Meteor Outbursts and Meteor Storms
19
The Great Leonid Meteor Storms
20
References and Useful Web Sites Books
22
Meteorites Fragments of Asteroids
23
Main Asteroid Belt
24
Discovery of the First Asteroids
25
Cataloging and Naming New Asteroids
27
NearEarth Objects
28
Trojan Asteroids
29
The Five Major NEO Surveys
30
4 Vesta
33
1 Ceres
34
Asteroid Close Encounters
35
253 Mathilde
36
Hayabusa
38
The Dawn Mission to 4 Vesta and 1 Ceres
40
References and Useful Web Sites Books
41
Meteoroids to Meteorites Lessons in Survival
42
Fireballs
44
Ablation
45
Brecciated Meteorites and Multiple Falls
48
The Strewn Field
52
Meteorite Surface Features
53
The Secondary Fusion Crust
58
The Big Ones
65
Weathering of Meteorites
68
References and Useful Web Sites Books
70
Magazines
71
The Family of Meteorites
74
The Chondrites
75
Primary Minerals in Chondritic Stony Meteorites
76
Olivine
77
Accessory Minerals
78
Petrographic Types of Ordinary Chondrites
81
Ordinary Chondrites
84
Carbonaceous Chondrites
90
A Chondrule Gallery
106
Primitive and Differentiated Meteorites Asteroidal Achondrites
113
Differentiation
114
Achondrites
115
Primitive Achondrites
116
IIAB Group
152
IIIAB Group
153
IVB Group
154
Differentiated Meteorites StonyIrons
166
Pallasites
167
Eagle Station Pallasites
169
CHAPTER NINE
175
Collecting and Analyzing Meteorites
181
In the Field
182
What Should you Look for?
188
Hunting with Metal Detectors
191
What are your Meteorites Worth?
195
Is Collecting Meteorites Legal?
196
Final Thoughts
197
Information on old falls and finds
199
From Hand Lens to Microscope
200
What Is a Thin Section?
201
What Are Interference Colors?
202
Make Your Own Simple Petrographic Microscope
204
How to Adjust and Use the Petrographic Microscope
205
Light Source Brightness and Blue Filter
206
Polarizing Filters
208
Mechanical Stage
209
Measuring the Size of Objects in Thin Sections
210
Using Reflected Light and Transmitted Light
212
Examining Meteorites in Thin Section
214
Classifying Your Chondrite
222
TexturesTheir Look and Meaning
223
The Look of ShockTextures and Stages
229
Photographing Thin Sections
231
Macro CloseUp Photography
233
Photography Through the Microscope
234
Useful Web Sites
237
Minerals in Meteorites
238
Petrographic Types
247
Useful Tests
249
Etching Iron Meteorites
255
Unit Conversions
258
Composition Percentages
260
Equipment Storage and Display
262
Glossary
265
Meteorite Index
280
General Index
283
Copyright

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Page vi - ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This book could not have been written without the assistance of a number of people.
Page 18 - High-resolution radar in which the radar beam is directed at right angles to the direction of the flight.

About the author (2008)

O. Richard Norton fell in love with meteorites while studying astronomy at UCLA with renowned meteoriticist Frederick C. Leonard. As director of the Fleischmann Planetarium at the Univeristy of Nevada at Reno and the Flandrau Planetarium at the University of Arizona at Tucson, he taught astronomy and shared his enthusiasm for meteorites, geology, and photography in public lectures and community education classes. He traveled to Cape Canaveral to film the Apollo launches, designed a fish-eye motion picture system that flew on the space shuttle Challenger, and led field trips to photograph total solar eclipses and comets around the world. His previous books about meteorites are "Rocks from Space", "The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites", and "Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites". He was a fellow of the Meteorological Society and a contributing editor of Meteorite magazine. He died in 2009 before he completed work on this book.

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