Farm Families & Change in Twentieth-century America

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University Press of Kentucky, 1988 - Business & Economics - 282 pages
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The farm family is a unique institution, perhaps the last remnant, in an increasingly complex world, of a simpler social order in which economic and domestic activities were inextricably bound together. In the past few years, however, American agriculture has suffered huge losses, and family farmers have seen their way of life threatened by economic forces beyond their control. At a time when agriculture is at a crossroads, this study provides a needed historical perspective on the problems family farmers have faced since the turn of the century.
  

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Contents

CornBelt Farming
15
Central Valley Ranching
29
Land Tenure
47
Inheritance
74
Credit
99
Family
127
Community
158
CornBelt Crisis
190
Central Valley Crisis
223
Conclusion
246
A Note on Sources and Methods
252
Notes
254
Index
278
Copyright

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Page 1 - Our neighbor joining us on the east, a hard-working man, had rented 320 acres of land. He and his wife and one hired man farmed it. They had about 100 head of cattle and about the same number of hogs. The 1st of December they turned everything over to the landlord, save one team, which they hitched to an old wagon, put in their household goods, got in the wagon themselves, and drove away to town to get work at day labor and make a new start in life.
Page ix - Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. I would like to thank Charles Gibson, Margaret Ventura, Marvin Pook, Louis Avila, and Elsworth Genus of the Belize Archives Department for their assistance.
Page ix - Acknowledgments This book would not have been completed without the support of many institutions and individuals.

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