The Last Days of Pompeii

Front Cover
Echo Library, Jan 1, 2007 - Fiction - 304 pages
9 Reviews
This is the classic Victorian tale of the last days of Pompeii, the doomed city that lay at the feet of Mount Vesuvius. From poets to flower-girls, gladiators to Roman tribunes, here is a plausible story of their lives, their loves, and the tragic fate that awaited them.

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Review: The Last Days of Pompeii

User Review  - Brad Hodges - Goodreads

Once wildly popular, Baron Edward Bulwer-Lytton is now best know for a couple of his quotes. One is "the pen is mightier than the sword," which is often used; the other is the opening to his novel ... Read full review

Review: The Last Days of Pompeii

User Review  - Patrick - Goodreads

Once you get past the over-the-top writing, this is pretty good. Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton was an English novelist, poet, playwright, and politician. Lord Lytton was a florid, popular writer of his day, who coined such phrases as "the great unwashed," "pursuit of the almighty dollar," "the pen is mightier than the sword," and the infamous incipit "It was a dark and stormy night.

Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton, 1803-1873 Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Lord of Lytton, was one of the most popular novelists of ninteenth century England. He was born on May 25, 1803. Bulwer-Lytton was also a poet, playwright and politician. He coined the phrases the "pursuit of the almighty dollar", "the pen is mightier than the sword", as well as the infamous opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". His literary career began in 1820 with the publication of a book of poems and spanned much of the nineteenth century. He wrote in a variety of genres, including historical fiction, mystery, romance, the occult, and science fiction. Bulwer-Lytton was friends with the likes of Charles Dickens and Benjamin Disraeli and served as the Secretary of State for the Colonies in 1858 and 1859. Bulwer-Lytton died on January 18, 1873, just short of his 70th birthday. The cause of death was not clear but it was thought that an infection he had in his ear had affected his brain.

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