The child's book of nature: for the use of families and schools : intended to aid mothers and teachers in training children in the observation of nature (Google eBook)

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Harper & Brothers, 1868 - Science
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Page 7 - Hooker's Child's Book of Nature. The Child's Book of Nature, for the Use of Families and Schools : intended to aid Mothers and Teachers in Training Children in the Observation of Nature. In Three Parts. Part I. Plants. Part II. Animals. Part III. Air, Water, Heat, Light, &c. By WORTHINGTON HOOKER, MD Engravings.
Page 50 - For all flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof f alleth away : 25 But the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you.
Page 40 - Some flowers hang down their heads at night, as if nodding in their sleep, but in the morning they lift them up again, to welcome the light. Other flowers have a par-ticular time to open. The evening primrose, for example, is so called because it does not open till evening.
Page 18 - ... to her than the flattery of her attendants. She, too, had a cherished flower —the sweet jasmine— that she had brought from the home of her youth, a far-off island of the West Indies. This had been planted and reared by her own hand, and though its simple beauty would scarcely have excited the attention of a stranger, it was dearer to her than all the rare and brilliant flowers that filled her hothouses. She thought a good deal, therefore, of the prisoner that took such care of his one flower....
Page 17 - Shut up within those walls, away from all hia friends, not permitted to interest himself with either reading or writing, he was glad to have this little living thing to watch over and love. Every day when he walked in the court he spent much time in looking at it. He soon saw some buds. He watched them as they grew larger and larger, and longed to see them open ; and when the flowers at length came out ho was filled with joy.
Page 16 - Napoleon because he was supposed to be an enemy of the government. One day as Charney (for that was his name) was walking in the yard adjoining his cell, he saw a plant pushing up from between the stones. How it came there he could not tell. Perhaps some one carelessly dropped the seed.
Page 77 - ... make them look very awkward; but the flowers are very beautiful. It is a singular fact that if one of the leaves be broken off and put into the ground, it will take root and grow. 8. Why does a leaf fade when it is plucked from a tree ? It is because the sap can no longer get to it ; just as no water can get into a house when the water-pipe is cut off.
Page 19 - ... of a stranger, it was dearer to her than all the rare and brilliant flowers that filled her hothouses. She thought a good deal, therefore, of the prisoner that took such care of his one flower. She inquired about him, and after a little time persuaded the Emperor to give him his freedom. And when...
Page 36 - I'm found, Peeping just above the ground. And my stalk is cover'd flat, With a white and yellow hat. Little lady, when you pass Lightly o'er the tender grass, Skip about, but do not tread On my meek and healthy head, For I always seem to say,
Page 74 - This plant is quite common in the island of Ceylon, where it is called the monkey-cup, because the monkeys sometimes open the lid and drink the water. Men, too...

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