The Nursery Rhymes of England: Obtained Principally from Oral Tradition (Google eBook)

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J.R.Smith, 1843
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Page 76 - OLD Mother Hubbard Went to the cupboard, To get her poor dog a bone: But when she got there The cupboard was bare, And so the poor dog had none.
Page 122 - A MAN of words and not of deeds Is like a garden full of weeds; And when the weeds begin to grow, It's like a garden full of snow...
Page 47 - There was a little man, and he had a little gun, And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead; He went to the brook, and saw a little duck, / And shot it right through the head,
Page 53 - There was an old woman who lived In a shoe, She had so many children, she didn't know what to do. She gave them some broth without any bread, She whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.
Page 8 - Then came the Holy One, blessed be He, And killed the Angel of death That killed the butcher That slew the ox That drank the water That quenched the fire That burned the staff That beat the dog That bit the cat That ate the kid That my father bought For two pieces of money : A kid, a kid.
Page 93 - Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep, And can't tell where to find them; Leave them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them.
Page 135 - Gay go up, and gay go down, To ring the bells of London town. Bull's eyes and targets, Say the bells of St. Marg'ret's. Brickbats and tiles, Say the bells of St. Giles'. Half-pence and farthings, Say the bells of St. Martin's. Oranges and lemons, Say the bells of St. Clement's. Pancakes and fritters, Say the bells of St. Peter's. Two sticks and an apple, Say the bells at Whitechapel.
Page 103 - Hey, diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed to see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon!
Page 117 - As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kitsó Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were going to St. Ives?
Page 43 - THERE was an old man, who lived in a wood, As you may plainly see ; He said he could do as much work in a day, As his wife could do in three. With all my heart...

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