The triumph of American medicine in the construction of the Panama Canal (Google eBook)

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Dornan, 1911 - Canal Zone - 25 pages
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Page 12 - This is accomplished in the Canal zone by either raising the houses three feet from the ground on supports of concrete or other material, covered with tin, so that the rats cannot secure a footing on them, or if placed on the ground they must rest on a floor of concrete. The buildings are submitted to inspection at regular intervals; those not in a sanitary condition in the cities must be placed in that condition, if possible, by the owner, or they are condemned and destroyed.
Page 22 - In a visit made in the last winter to South America, I landed in Santos, Brazil, a city of 41,000 population, and one of the best ports on the Atlantic Ocean. A few years ago this port was devastated by raging epidemics of yellow fever. To such...
Page 19 - Wassermann reactions, blood cultures, vaccines, chemical analyses for the Commission and chemical examinations for the Ancon and other hospitals, of milk and foods (toxicological), special examinations of urine, etc., chemical, bacteriological, and microscopic examination of all Zone water, supplies, including five reservoirs. The research work involves various subjects, reports upon which have been published by Dr. Darling. Possibly the most important is that entitled " Studies in Relation to Malaria/'...
Page 22 - ... banished yellow fever, converting its beautiful harbor from a home of pestilence into an attractive seaside home, with the ships of many nations unloading and loading in guaranteed security alongside of its commodious and well arranged quays.
Page 19 - Health, forming a part of the department of sanitation, in charge of Samuel T. Darling, MD, Chief of the Laboratory. Through the courtesy of Dr. Darling I was permitted to observe the methods of work carried on in the laboratory, which made my visit full of interest. The equipment of the laboratory is complete, the...
Page 24 - In war time it has regularly claimed more victims than the enemy's bullets. Our troops in Cuba, as everyone will recall, were decimated by this scourge, which "stalked through the camp, apparently unrestrained, laying low one-sixth of the entire command." There is every prospect that all this will now be changed. Typhoid fever, thanks to the new knowledge of sanitation, combined with the use of the preventive vaccine, will be as thoroughly subject to scientific control as smallpox has been since...
Page 16 - ... Canal Zone since 1905. It has not been possible to deal with malaria in quite so radical a fashion; but this disease also has been held in check and in a large measure rendered innocuous. As contrasted with the appalling mortality of the workmen under the French regime, it is sufficient to note that "in the year 1909 the annual death rate per thousand of 11,662 white employes was 6.43 from disease, and 3.43 from violence ; total" 9.86. Of Americans, of the 8,386, including employes and their...
Page 15 - the fly has now become a rara avis within the Zone limits, and is very much less abundant than in the villages and towns of our country." Dr. Mears declares that during his stay in the Canal Zone he saw but a single specimen; and we may readily accept his assertion that the comfort enjoyed owing to their absence is very great. Unlike the flea and the mosquito, the fly does not...

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