The Coinage of Ireland in Copper, Tin, and Pewter, 1460-1826 (Google eBook)

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W. M. Murphy, 1905 - Coinage - 98 pages
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Page 79 - ... and government, we have thought fit, by the advice of our Privy Council, to...
Page 4 - ... whereby such small portions and quantities of things vendible as the necessity and use, especially of the poorer sort of people, oftentimes required, might be conveniently bought and sold without enforcement to buy more ware than would serve for their use and occasions.
Page 55 - Irlandes d'argent, to pass for the value of one penny sterling ; the other of vij. ob of troy weight, having imprinted on one part of it a crown, and on the other part a cross, called a Patrick, of which eight shall pass for one denier. That a gross be made of the weight of three deniers sterling, and to pass for four deniers sterling, which shall have imprinted on it on one side a crown, and on the other side a cross like the...
Page 86 - We, the Grand-Jury, and other inhabitants of the Liberty «f the Dean and Chapter of St Patrick's, Dublin, whose names are underwritten, do unanimously declare and determine, that we never will receive or pay any of the halfpence or farthings already coined, or that shall hereafter be coined, by one William Wood, being not obliged by law to receive the same ; because we are thoroughly convinced by the addresses of both houses of Parliament, as well as by that of his Majesty's most honourable privy-council,...
Page 79 - Kingdom, and that our standing forces may be the better paid and subsisted, and that our subjects of this realm may be the better enabled to pay and discharge the taxes, excise, customs, rents and other debts and duties which are or shall be hereafter payable to us...
Page 87 - ... which trade hath suffered by the apprehensions of the said coin, whereof we have already felt the dismal effects ; and that the currency thereof will inevitably tend to the great diminution of his majesty's revenue, and the ruin of us and our posterity, do present all such persons as have attempted or shall endeavour by fraud, or otherwise, to impose the said halfpence upon us...
Page 50 - In 1789, Mossop, a jeweller in Dublin and a die-sinker of very considerable merit, prepared a pattern penny, of which only six examples are said to have been struck, and two of them were presented to George III. Its rarity is due to the fact that the die for the reverse broke.
Page 59 - ... army, and for other services, that a great part of such monies into this realme sent doe either come into the handes of her rebels by divers sleights and cunnings of theirs, who by the use and meanes thereof trafficking in forraine countries do releive themselves with such warlike provisions as they need, as with pouder, lead, match, armes, and weapons of all sorts, and with wines, cloth and other necessaries, without which they could not possibly so long subsist in their treasonable courses,...
Page 72 - ... law, as contemners of our royal prerogative and command. And we do hereby further publish and declare, that if any person or persons whatsoever will presume to counterfeit the said money, or any of the said pieces, that he or they so offending, shall be proceeded against as guilty of high treason. And in case any person or persons whatsoever will discover any such offender or offenders, so as he or they be brought to condign punishment...
Page 87 - As we do, with all just gratitude, acknowledge the services of all such patriots as have been eminently zealous for the interest of his majesty and this country, in detecting the fraudulent imposition of the said Wood, and preventing the passing of his base coin...

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