Eight Orations of Lysias (Google eBook)

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Ginn, 1895 - Speeches, addresses, etc., Greek - 223 pages
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Page 27 - Their strongest argument is that there is no direct mention of cvfrwai in the text. But, as Blass points out, the same sort of argument is equally strong against them ; for Lysias, in the first part of his speech, makes almost as much of the pillage of his property as he does of the execution of his brother, and he does not even mention Polemarchus in his recapitulation at the end. To this argument I would add that the action of Archinus (Arist. Resp. Ath. XL) in persuading the Senate to put to death...
Page 187 - Ten г who succeeded the Thirty had already fallen before the arrival of Pausanias, and that they were succeeded by a second Ten, who had begun negotiations for peace with the patriots in Peiraeeus before Pausanias came. (Lysias and the other authors do not mention this second Ten.2) The forces, therefore, that aided the first Ten were Lysander, with his mercenaries (Xen. Hellen. II. 4, 28 f., in number 1,000, according to Diod. 1 Why was not Eratosthenes one of this first Ten ( 55...
Page 188 - SiKa yer6uvos; for Aristotle mentions Rhinon as the leader of the second Ten. Sic. XIV, 33), and his brother Libys with a fleet (Xen. ibid.; of 40 ships, Diod. Sic. ibid.). Aristotle does not here mention either of these by name, but says only that the first Ten were helped by Callibius and the Peloponnesians then at hand, together with some of the knights. Callibius was the harmost, sent with a garrison (of 700, according to Arist. XXXVII) to maintain the Thirty. By...
Page 91 - ... for Piraeus, and five for the city; but now there are twenty for the city and fifteen for Piraeus. Their duties are, first, to see that the unprepared corn in the market is offered for sale at reasonable prices, and secondly, to see that the millers sell barley meal at a price proportionate to that of barley, and that the bakers sell their loaves at a price proportionate to that of wheat, and of such weight as the Commissioners may appoint; for the law requires them to fix the standard weight.
Page 188 - VJT avrwv -gpiOr) ; but it does not appear from any author that the irpoov\oi. had power to fill any of the offices. Theramenes, one of the Four Hundred, was nominated and chosen general by the Four Hundred themselves ; Arist. ibid. XXX. XII, 77то tlpr/j.tvois rpvoi VIT' ifiov avro amos ycyii^/ntvoc.
Page 26 - Staying on, as Eratosthenes did in Athens, he must have known that charges would be brought against him by his enemies, and hence he would avail himself as soon as possible of that clause in the amnesty by which those of the Thirty who chose to submit their accounts of office, were no longer liable to attacks for the past. This would have been the easiest way once and for all to have done with those who had anything against him. Fuhr and Gebauer in their editions have held (as against Blass, Att....
Page 188 - These avSpts, according to the editors of Lysias, were the avowed or secret friends of Athens in Argos, Thebes, Corinth, and elsewhere, as well as all who were jealous of Lysander. But the patriots of Peiraeeus too...
Page 26 - Lysias at the ev0vvai of Eratosthenes, and not at a trial for murder. When Lysias returned to Athens from exile, he found there the very man through whose agency his brother Polemarchus had been delivered over to the Thirty for execution. Eratosthenes had not gone to Eleusis under the terms of the amnesty (stated in Arist. Resp. Ath. XXXIX); for, once there, he could not have been brought back to answer such a charge as Lysias had to make. Even if past murders are included under the provision in...
Page 193 - Of recent editors only Jebb and Shuckburgh retain the vulgate, but they seem to me to be right, for it is near the reading of the MS., and in its tense (G., MT 87) it denotes the repeated number of cases which would arise after the report of the phylarchs had once for all (Airevt-yKv, aorisf) been made.
Page 188 - J who succeeded the Thirty had already fallen before the arrival of Pausanias, and that they were succeeded by a second Ten, who had begun negotiations for peace with the patriots in Peiraeeus before Pausanias came. (Lysias and the other authors do not mention this second Ten.2) The forces, therefore, that aided the first Ten were Lysander, with his mercenaries (Xen. Hellen. II. 4, 28 f., in number 1,000, according to Diod. 1 Why was not Eratosthenes one of this first Ten ( 55)? Was it because...

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