Banvard's Folly: Tales of Renowned Obscurity, Famous Anonymity and Rotten Luck

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Pan Macmillan, Nov 1, 2002 - Eccentrics and eccentricities - 304 pages
39 Reviews

History will long remember the Edisons, Einsteins and Darwins: they succeeded in changing the world, and the world has repaid them by enshrining their names. But what of those others with similarly revolutionary and groundbreaking ideas who plummeted into oblivion? What of the man who invented the N-ray? Or the one who made up a universal singing language? They are gone and forgotton. . . until now.

'Failure is generally a lot more interesting than success . . . this book was only a modest success in America; it deserves to be a huge one here, since we have a better natural empathy with the sweet misery of not being quite good enough at things. Failure's coming home; we should all support it by buying Paul Collins' wonderful book' Mail on Sunday

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Review: Banvard's Folly: Thirteen Tales of People Who Didn't Change the World

User Review  - Jade Kessler - Goodreads

Some things were very interesting, others not so much...but that would be "all in the eyes of the beholder". Read full review

Review: Banvard's Folly: Thirteen Tales of People Who Didn't Change the World

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

I didn't finish this because I couldn't quite get into it. I read 4 or 5 of the short stories though. It is a cool idea, but kind of depressing as a collection. I thought it would be more about non-famous people's lives, as opposed to people who failed at being famous. Read full review

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