Literature of the revolutionary period, 1765-1787 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. E. Benjamin, 1894 - American literature
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 408 - What hands are here ? ha ! they pluck out mine eyes. Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand ? No, this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red.
Page 120 - Blessings be with them and eternal praise. Who gave us nobler loves and nobler cares The poets, who on earth have made us heirs Of truth and pure delight by heavenly lays ! Oh-!
Page 425 - Those who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever He had a chosen people, whose breasts He has made His peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue.
Page 455 - With the movements in this hemisphere, we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes w^hich must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the Allied Powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Page viii - Lords and Commons of England, consider what nation it is whereof ye are and whereof ye are the governors : a nation not slow and dull, but of a quick, ingenious, and piercing spirit, acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to discourse, not beneath the reach of any point the highest that human capacity can soar to.
Page 571 - The Discovery of the Great West, 1869; The Old Regime in Canada, 1874; Count Frontenac and New France Under Louis XIV, 1877; Montcalm and Wolfe, 1884; A Half Century of Conflict, 1892. After 1879, The Discovery of the Great West (1869) was published as La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West.
Page 425 - ... the proportion which the aggregate of the other classes of citizens bears in any State to that of its husbandmen, is the proportion of its unsound to its healthy parts, and is a good enough barometer whereby to measure its degree of corruption.
Page 141 - The birds of the air, the beasts of the field, and the fishes of the sea, say that God is love...
Page 357 - There fragrant flowers immortal bloom, And joys supreme are given ; There rays divine...
Page 338 - If I should die tonight,' My friends would call to mind with loving thought, Some kindly deed the icy hand had wrought, Some gentle word the frozen lips had said; Errands on which the willing feet had sped. The memory of my selfishness and pride, My hasty words, would all be put aside, And so I should be loved and mourned tonight.

Bibliographic information