The History of Scotland: During the Life of Queen Mary, and Until the Accession of Her Son James to the Crown of England (Google eBook)

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at the University Press, 1831 - Scotland - 520 pages
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Contents

Proposal of sending the young Queen to France
51
The Regent Earl of Arran now Duke of Chatelherault resigns
58
The Novelists assume and give new titlestheir bond of unionFirst
64
Preparations for the marrisgc of Queen Mary with the Dauphin
71
Articles of contractSolemnization of the marriage page
73
The Bishops ought to have offered liberty of conscience
79
Terms proposed by the CongregationGlencairn joins them
86
Adverse armies march to CuparThe rebels take Perth
92
A proclamation by the QueenRegent
98
Meeting among the insurgentsMoney sent them by Elizabeth
106
English fleet anchor in Leith Road
112
Treaty of peace at EdinburghFrench commissioners outwitted
118
New superintendents 123An irregular Parliament
125
Some excuses lor the Uen ot the Catholic Prelates pac
128
Comparison of the ld and new Creeds
136
dies
143
Singular Church polity I
149
CHAPTER III
155
The Queen commands toleration on both sidesArrans ravings
161
Knoxs wild rant 1C6Laws paralysed by the Reformers
167
Some provision made for the preachers
173
Sir John Gordon breaks ward11 untly incensed against I ord James
179
Paul Methvtns backsliding and shelter in the new creed
186
Overtures from FranceElizabeths duplicity
193
Murray refuses his consent 199Damley disgusts the nobles
200
Barbarous persecutionBoth well returns from exile page
201
The rebel Lords are forced to retire southwards and seek an asylum
208
Contrary advice from FranceA meeting of Parliament appointed
214
The King makes a ridiculous proclamation
220
Mary dismisses Randolphremoves to Alloa
226
Proposals of a divorce from Damley rejected by the Queen
232
The Queens grief and becoming deportment
238
Bothwell acquitted
244
Disgraceful document 24
250
Mary entitled to sympathyThe demoniac virulence of her enemies
256
F lizabeths fallacy imitated by Murray
317
Obtcqiousncs of the noblesMary is urged to abdicate the crown
330
Elizabeth and Murrays faction embarrassedLord Lindsays affected
332
The Regent fixes himself in authority ii
340
His death and character
348
The application to the King of Denmark to give up Bothwell dropt
355
Duplicity of the French Court 73
359
Conspiracy detectedNorfolk examined
362
Massacre of Paris
368
Fury of opposite factionsMortons scheme of accommodation
375
Elizabeths strange jealousySevere sufferings of Mary
381
Morton accused of the Kings murder tried condemned beheaded
387
Marys letter to ElizabethAmbassadors from France and England page
394
Throgmorton executedSeditious railing of the preachers
401
Association continuedArrans misdeeds
408
Wotton at the Scottish court his flight
414
Disunion of Marys friendsMorgans intriguesGifibrd and Greatley 41
421
Accusations against herHer Defence
428
Ralitication and petition by ParliamentElizabeths fearr
434
Elizabeths perplexity signs the deathwarrant proposes assassination
440
Consoles her servants bcr employment during her last night
447
Is beheadedTreatment of her body
453
CHAPTER VII
460
Annexation of the Churchlands to the Crown page
463
James accedes to Elizabeths offersPhilip not dismayed 409
470
Immorality prevailsBothwell accused of consulting witches his
476
Monday marketThe Lords submit to the King and ask a trial 4ttl
482
The Lords forfeitedPenal statutes
488
Dissimulation ot Klizabcth
490
Philip resents the loss sustained at Cadiz intends a new Armada
495
The Kings orders contemnedSeditious proceedings
501
They write to Lord Hamilton and flee to England 50i
508
James sends agents to Germany and Bruce to England
514
Raid of Ruthven 393
523
Adventures of the Earl of Essex courts the friendthip of Junes pags
524

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Page 21 - If I do not the works of my Father, believe me not. But if I do, though ye believe not me, believe the works : that ye may know, and believe, that the Father is in me, and I in him.
Page 64 - The which our duty being well considered, we do promise, before the majesty of God and His Congregation, that we (by His grace) shall with all diligence continually apply our whole power, substance, and our very lives, to maintain, set forward, and establish the most blessed Word of God...
Page 447 - world is but vanity, subject to more sorrow than an ** ocean of tears can bewail. But I pray thee, report " that I die a true woman to my religion, to Scotland " and to France. May God forgive them that have " long thirsted for my blood, as the hart doth for the " brooks of water. O God, thou art the author of truth, " and truth itself. Thou knowest the inward chambers " of my thoughts ; and that I always wished the union
Page 301 - English court for the examination of this great cause were, the Duke of Norfolk, the Earl of Sussex, and Sir Ralph Sadler ; and York was named as the place of conference.
Page 433 - If I should say unto you that I mean not to grant your petition, by my faith I should say unto you more than perhaps I mean.
Page 445 - ... her, she thanked Heaven that her sufferings were now so near an end, and prayed that she might be enabled to endure what still remained with decency and with fortitude.
Page 138 - Amen, amen, I say to thee, unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.
Page 447 - Good Melville, cease to lament; thou hast rather cause to joy than mourn; for thou shalt see the end of Mary Stuart's troubles. Know that this world is but vanity, subject to more sorrow than an ocean of tears can bewail. But, I pray thee, report that I die a true woman to my religion, to Scotland, and to France. May God forgive them that have long thirsted for my blood, as the hart doth for the brooks of water.
Page 449 - She bore without shrinking the gaze of the spectators, and the sight of the scaffold, the block, and the executioner, and advanced into the hall with that grace and majesty which she had so often displayed in her happier days, and in the palace of her fathers. To aid her as she mounted the scaffold, Paulet offered his arm. " I thank you, sir," said Mary ; " it is the last trouble I shall give you, and the most acceptable service jou have ever rendered me.
Page 447 - God, thou art the author of truth, and truth itself. Thou knowest the inward chambers of my thoughts, and that I always wished the union of England and Scotland. Commend me to my son, and tell him that I have done nothing prejudicial to the dignity or independence of his crown, or favourable to the pretended superiority of our enemies.

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