First Book in Hygiene: A Primer of Physiology (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1903 - Health - 144 pages
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Page 97 - Is this a time to be cloudy and sad, When our mother Nature laughs around ; "When even the deep blue heavens look glad, And gladness breathes from the blossoming ground ? There are notes of joy from the hang-bird and wren, And the gossip of swallows through all the sky; The ground-squirrel gayly chirps by his den, And the wilding bee hums merrily by.
Page 41 - HEAP high the farmer's wintry hoard ! Heap high the golden corn ! No richer gift has Autumn poured From out her lavish horn ! Let other lands, exulting, glean The apple from the pine, The orange from its glossy green, The cluster from the vine...
Page 42 - We dropped the seed o'er hill and plain, Beneath the sun of May, And frightened from our sprouting grain The robber crows away. All through the long, bright days of June Its leaves grew green and fair, And waved in hot midsummer's noon Its soft and yellow hair. And now, with autumn's moonlit eves, Its harvest-time has come, We pluck away the frosted leaves, And bear the treasure home.
Page 138 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 126 - twas a dream they'd dreamed Of sailing that beautiful sea But I shall name you the fishermen three: Wynken, Blynken, and Nod. Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes, And Nod is a little head, And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies Is a wee one's trundle-bed.
Page 60 - The thirsty earth soaks up the rain, And drinks, and gapes for drink again, The plants suck in the earth, and are With constant drinking fresh and fair. The sea itself, which one would think Should have but little need of drink, Drinks ten thousand rivers up, So fill'd that they oerflow the cup. The busy sun (and one would guess...
Page 92 - Oh! it showed me a face in its warm sunny tide That gazed back at me so gay and glorified, It made me love myself, as I leaped to caress My shadder smilin' up at me with sich tenderness.
Page 93 - IF Mother Nature patches The leaves of trees and vines, I'm sure she does her darning With the needles of the pines. They are so long and slender; And sometimes, in full view, They have their thread of cobwebs, And thimbles made of dew.
Page 125 - WYNKEN, Blynken and Nod one night Sailed off in a wooden shoe Sailed on a river of crystal light, Into a sea of dew. " Where are you going, and what do you wish ? " The old moon asked the three. " We have come to fish for the herring fish That live in this beautiful sea ; Nets of silver and gold have we ! " Said Wynken, Blynken, And Nod.
Page 92 - THE OLD SWIMMIN'-HOLE. OH! the old swimmin'-hole! whare the crick so still and deep Looked like a baby-river that was laying half asleep, And the gurgle of the worter round the drift jest below Sounded like the laugh of something we onc't ust to know Before we could remember anything but the eyes Of the angels lookin...

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