Community in the Digital Age: Philosophy and Practice

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Andrew Feenberg, Darin David Barney
Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2004 - Computers - 293 pages
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Is the Internet the key to a reinvigorated public life? Or will it fragment society by enabling citizens to associate only with like-minded others? Online community has provided social researchers with insights into our evolving social life. As suburbanization and the breakdown of the extended family and neighborhood isolate individuals more and more, the Internet appears as a possible source for reconnection. Are virtual communities "real" enough to support the kind of personal commitment and growth we associate with community life, or are they fragile and ultimately unsatisfying substitutes for human interaction? Community in the Digital Age features the latest, most challenging work in an important and fast-changing field, providing a forum for some of the leading North American social scientists and philosophers concerned with the social and political implications of this new technology. Their provocative arguments touch on all sides of the debate surrounding the Internet, community, and democracy.
  

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Contents

Consumers or Citizens? The Online Community Debate
1
The Vanishing Table Or Community in a World That Is No World
31
Is the Internet the Solution to the Problem of Community?
53
Nihilism on the Information Highway Anonymity versus Commitment in the Present Age
69
Workers as Cyborgs Labor and Networked Computers
83
Our Split Screens
101
Virtual Togetherness An Everyday Life Perspective
121
Gender and the Commodification of Community Womencom and gURLcom
143
Virtually Democratic Online Communities and Internet Activism
183
The Practical Republic Social Skills and the Progress of Citizenship
201
On Virtual Democratic Communities
225
The Internet and Political Transformation Revisited
239
Toward Civic Intelligence Building a New Sociotechnological Infrastructure
263
Index
287
List of Contributors
291
Copyright

Ethics on the Internet A Comparative Study of Japan the United States and Singapore
161

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About the author (2004)

Andrew Feenberg is the Canada Research Chair in the Philosophy of Technology at Simon Fraser University. Darin Barney is assistant professor of communication at McGill University.

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