The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 27 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable, 1816
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Page 293 - was a sound of revelry by night; Her Beauty and her Chivalry, and bright And Belgium's capital had gathered then The lamps shone o'er fair women and brave men; A thousand hearts beat happily; and when Music arose with its voluptuous swell, And all went merry as a marriage-bell; But hush ! hark
Page 66 - But whispering tongues can poison truth ; And constancy lives in realms above ; And life is thorny ; and youth is vain ; And to be wroth with, one we love, Doth' work like madness in the brain. * With this one exception, there is literally not one couplet
Page 294 - Which now beneath them, but above shall grow In its next verdure, when this fiery mass Of living valour, rolling on the loe And burning with high hope, shall moulder cold and low.* After some brief commemoration of the worth and valour that fell in that bloody field, the author turns to the many hopeless mourners
Page 301 - ye are wondrous strong, Yet lovely in your strength, as is the light Of a dark eye in woman ! Far along, From peak to peak, the rattling crags among Leaps the live thunder ! Not from one lone cloud, But every mountain now
Page 65 - That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome ! those caves of ice ! And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware ! Beware ! His flashing eyes, his floating hair ! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread : For he on honey-dew hath fed,' &c. &c
Page 293 - Soft eyes look'd love to eyes which spake again, ' Ah ! then and there was hurrying to and fro, And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress, And cheeks all pale, which but an hour ago Blush'd at the praise of their own loveliness;
Page 300 - thy contrasted lake, With the wide world I dwelt in, is a thing Which warns me, with its stillness, to forsake Earth's troubled waters for a purer spring. This quiet sail is as a noiseless wing To waft me from distraction ; once I loved Torn ocean's roar, but thy soft murmuring Sounds sweet as if a sister's voice
Page 318 - abjure any intention to subvert the present Church establishment, for the purpose of substituting a Catholic establishment in its stead ; and I do solemnly swear, that I will not exercise any privilege to which 1 am or may .become entitled, to disturb or weaken the Protestant religion and Protestant government in this Kingdom.
Page 287 - opening verses, though soft and voluptuous, are tinged with the same shade of sorrow which gives its character and harmony to the whole poem. * It is the hour when from the boughs The nightingale's high note is heard ; It is the hour when lovers' vows Seem sweet in every whisper'd word ; And gentle
Page 294 - And there were sudden parting*, such as press The life from out young hearts, and choking sighs Which ne'er might be repeated :—who could guess If ever more should meet those mutual eyes. Since upon nights so sweet

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