The History of the United States of America, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper & Brothers, 1880 - United States
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Contents

Indian Tribute Indian Missions
373
Dissensions in the Board of New England Commissioners 379 Clarkes Visit to Lynn his Arrest and Trial
379
Opposition of Clayborne 208
382
Reported Dutch and Indian Plot
385
Settlement at St Marys 205
389
Indian Affairs Towns required to have Ministers
392
Reunion Williams President Nonresistanco
398
AntiQuaker Legislation in New England
405
CHAPTER XIII
413
War with the Tappan Indians the Twelve Men
419
Expeditions Murder of Patrick
425
Melyn and Kieft the Nine Men
438
Proclamations against the Regicides
451
Synod Halfway Covenant
457
Consolidation of Connecticut and New Haven 402
465
Massachusetts ordered to send Agents to answer for refusing
471
Third Church in Boston Quaker Enthusiasts
474
478 The Wampanoags King Philip of Mount Hope 479 Origin of Philips War
480
New England Union revived Troops
486
Result of the War to the Indiansto the Colonists
493
Massachusetts Law to enforce the Acts of Trade
499
Massachusetts Proprietary Government in Maine
503
CHAPTER XV
509
Church Establishment Judiciary Indians
515
Conspiracy of indented Servants
521
Agents to buy up those Grants Taxes
527
Uacons Expedition against the Indians
533
Act for raising an Army Indian Trade prohibited
539
The Queen of Pamunkey
541
Death of Bacon Drummond and Lawrence
547
Berkeley implacable Capital and other Punishments
553
Chicheley Governor the Frontiers Right of Fishing
559
The Burgesses lose the Appointment of their Clerk
565
Intermarriage Law Decisions under it
570
Copyright

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Page 302 - He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a dog by the ears.
Page 357 - I do declare and promise, that I will be true and faithful to the Commonwealth of England, as it is now established, without a King or House of Lords.
Page 309 - This liberty is the proper end and object of authority and cannot subsist without it; and it is a liberty to that only which is good, just, and honest. This liberty you are to stand for, with the hazard (not only of your goods, but) of your lives, if need be.
Page 184 - The Humble Request of His Majesty's Loyall Subjects, the Governor and the Company late gone for New England; to the rest of their Brethren in and of the Church of England...
Page 397 - I further add that I never denied, that notwithstanding this liberty, the commander of this ship ought to command the ship's course, yea, and also command that justice, peace and sobriety, be kept and practiced, both among the seamen and all the passengers.
Page 330 - Further, the Lord hath been pleased to turn all the wigwams, huts, and hovels the English dwelt in at their first coming, into orderly, fair, and well-built houses...
Page 370 - It being one chief project of that old deluder Satan to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures, as in former times by keeping them in an unknown tongue, so in these latter times by persuading from the use of tongues...
Page 397 - There goes many a ship to sea, with many hundred souls in one ship, whose weal and woe is common, and is a true picture of a commonwealth or a human combination or society. It hath fallen out sometimes that both Papists and Protestants, Jews and Turks, may be embarked in one ship ; upon which supposal I affirm, that all the liberty of conscience that ever I pleaded for, turns upon these two hinges that none of the Papists, Protestants, Jews, or Turks, be forced to come to the ship's prayers or...
Page 328 - The serpent is the devil ; the synod, the representative of the churches of Christ in New England. The devil had formerly and lately attempted their disturbance and dissolution ; but their faith in the seed of the woman overcame him and crushed his head.
Page 174 - They were well weaned from the delicate milk of their mother country, and inured to the difficulties of a strange land.

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