Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 6, 2009 - Religion - 352 pages
20 Reviews

Like many Jews and Christians, David Plotz long assumed he knew what was in the Bible. He read parts of it as a child in Hebrew school, then at-tended a Christian high school where he studied the Old and New Testaments. Many of the highlights stuck with him—Adam and Eve, Cain versus Abel, Jacob versus Esau, Jonah versus whale, forty days and nights, ten plagues and commandments, twelve tribes and apostles, Red Sea walked under, Galilee walked on, bush into fire, rock into water, water into wine. And, of course, he absorbed from all around him other bits of the Bible—from stories he heard in churches and synagogues, in movies and on television, from his parents and teachers. But it wasn't until he picked up a Bible at a cousin's bat mitzvah—and became engrossed and horrified by a lesser-known story in Genesis—that he couldn't put it down.

At a time when wars are fought over scriptural interpretation, when the influence of religion on American politics has never been greater, when many Americans still believe in the Bible's literal truth, it has never been more important to get to know the Bible. Good Book is what happens when a regular guy—an average Job—actually reads the book on which his religion, his culture, and his world are based. Along the way, he grapples with the most profound theological questions: How many commandments do we actually need? Does God prefer obedience or good deeds? And the most unexpected ones: Why are so many women in the Bible prostitutes? Why does God love bald men so much? Is Samson really that stupid?

Good Book is an irreverent, enthralling journey through the world's most important work of literature.

  

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Review: Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible

User Review  - Autumn - Goodreads

Plotz was a Jew in name who read the Old Testament to better understand his heritage. He blogged the experience. Good companion to the Bible. Had to take a break from the Bible, so I'm taking a break ... Read full review

Review: Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible

User Review  - Jackie - Goodreads

Just Finished (37) Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible by David Plotz. The author, a writer for Slate ... Read full review

Contents

In the Beginning
1
Gods First Try
7
Let My Complaining Whining NoGoodnik People Go
35
Lovers and Lepers
55
The Source of All Jewish Comedy
69
The Bibles Fifth Beatle
85
Why So Many Bible Hookers?
99
The Meathead and the LeftHanded Assassin
109
All Those Books Youve Never Heard Of Plus Jonah and the Whale
219
150 Short Poems about God
229
Chicken Soup for the Hebrew Soul
241
Gods Bad Bet
247
Hot and Holy
259
My Favorite Bible Story
265
Bible Books for Rock Stars
269
The First Miss Universe Pageant
275

The Bibles Bill Clinton
123
Gods Favorite King
139
Kings of Pain
151
The End of Israel
167
Digging the Bible
177
The Jesus Preview
189
The Prophet and the Lustful SheCamel
201
Gods WholeGrain Hippie Prophet
209
Nice Pussycat
283
Coming Home
289
Return of the Kings
295
Should You Read the Bible?
299
Useful and Not So Useful Bible Lists
307
Acknowledgments
321
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

David Plotz is the editor of Slate. He has written for The New York Times Magazine, Harper's, Rolling Stone, The New Republic, The Washington Post, and GQ, and is the author of The Genius Factory: The Curious History of the Nobel Prize Sperm Bank. He won the National Press Club's Hume Award for political journalism and has been a National Magazine Award finalist. He lives with his wife, the journalist Hanna Rosin, and their children in Washington, D.C.

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