Sense and Sensibility

Front Cover
Penguin, 2009 - Fiction - 409 pages
6 Reviews
" As nearly flawless as any fiction could be."
-- Eudora Welty"As nearly flawless as any fiction could be."
--Eudora Welty"As nearly flawless as any fiction could be." --Eudora WeltyFamously characterized as the story of two Dashwood sisters who embody the conflict between the oppressive nature of "civilized" society and the human desire for romantic passion, there is far more to this story of two daughters made homeless by the death of their father. Elinor, 19, and Marianne, 17, initially project the opposing roles with Elinor cautious and unassuming about romantic matters, while Marianne is wild and passionate when she falls hopelessly in love with the libertine Mr. Willoughby. But the lessons in love and life see the two characters develop and change with sense and sensibility needing to be compromised as a matter of survival. Written when Austen was just 19, this story has been read as a biographical reflection of her relationship with her own sister Cassandra, with the younger Jane being the victim of "sensibility." However, the novel is far more than a simple case of passion versus manners, and depicts the romantic complications of two women made highly vulnerable by the loss of their father and estate.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
1
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AnnieMod - LibraryThing

Book #1 in my current project: "Read the classics again... the Norton way". This is a review of the Norton Critical Edition of "Sense and Sensibility", First Edition. So it will contain not just my ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - est-lm - LibraryThing

Sense and Sensibility is for those who don't mind a novel similar to Pride and Prejudice yet very different in terms of the characters; there is a morally ambiguous but attractive young suitor, two ... Read full review

About the author (2009)

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775 at Steventon near Basingstoke, the seventh child of the rector of the parish. She lived with her family at Steventon until they moved to Bath when her father retired in 1801. After his death in 1805, she moved around with her mother; in 1809, they settled in Chawton, near Alton, Hampshire. Here she remained, except for a few visits to London, until in May 1817 she moved to Winchester to be near her doctor. There she died on July 18, 1817.

As a girl Jane Austen wrote stories, including burlesques of popular romances. Her works were only published after much revision, four novels being published in her lifetime. These are Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816). Two other novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, were published posthumously in 1818 with a biographical notice by her brother, Henry Austen, the first formal announcement of her authorship. Persuasion was written in a race against failing health in 1815-16. She also left two earlier compositions, a short epistolary novel, Lady Susan, and an unfinished novel, The Watsons. At the time of her death, she was working on a new novel, Sanditon, a fragmentary draft of which survives.
Tony Tanner was a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge and a professor of English and American literature at the University of Cambridge. He died in December 1998.

Bibliographic information