New People: Miscegenation and Mulattoes in the United States

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Free Press, 1980 - Social Science - 221 pages
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New People is an insightful analysis of the miscegenation of American whites and blacks from colonial times to the present, of the "new people" produced by these interracial relationships, and of the myriad ways miscegenation has affected our national culture. Because the majority of American blacks are of mixed ancestry, and because mulattoes and pure blacks ultimately combined their cultural heritages, what begins in the colonial period as mulatto history and culture ends in the twentieth century as black history and culture. Thus, exploring the history of the mulatto becomes one way of understanding something of the experience of the African American. Williamson traces the fragile lines of color and caste that have separated mulattoes, blacks, and whites throughout history and speculates on the effect that the increasing ambiguity of those lines will have on the future of American society.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Changeover 18501915
61
Mulatto Life Style in the Early Twentieth
134
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

John Williamson is Senior Fellow at the Institute for International Economics in Washington, D.C. and the author of numerous books.

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