A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John Mandeville to William Cowper : Consisting of Biographical Sketches of the Authors, Selections from Their Works, with Notes, Explanatory and Illustrative, and Directing to the Best Editions and to Various Criticisms : Designed as a Text Book for the the Highest Classes in Schools and for Junior Classes in Colleges, as Well as for Private Reading (Google eBook)

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1872 - English literature - 776 pages
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Page 600 - Muse, The place of fame and elegy supply: And many a holy text around she strews, That teach the rustic moralist to die. For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 599 - Th' applause of listening senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their history in a nation's eyes, Their lot forbade : nor circumscribed alone Their growing virtues, but their crimes confined ; Forbade to wade through slaughter to a throne, And shut the gates of mercy on mankind.
Page 640 - Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food convenient for me: lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the Lord? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.
Page 365 - If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, and one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled ; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit?
Page 215 - We have short time to stay, as you, We have as short a Spring ; As quick a growth to meet decay As you, or any thing. We die, As your hours do, and dry Away Like to the Summer's rain ; Or as the pearls of morning's dew, Ne'er to be found again.
Page 749 - And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself and children three, Will fill the chaise; so you must ride On horseback after we. He soon replied, I do admire Of womankind but one, And you are she, my dearest dear, Therefore it shall be done. I am a linen-draper bold, As all the world doth know, And my good friend the calender Will lend his horse to go.
Page 598 - Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds ; Save that, from yonder ivy-mantled tower, The moping owl does to the moon complain Of such as, wandering near her secret bower, Molest her ancient solitary reign.
Page 751 - Away went hat and wig; He little dreamt, when he set out, Of running such a rig. The wind did blow, the cloak did fly Like streamer long and gay, Till, loop and button failing both, At last it flew away . Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung; A bottle swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children screamed, Up flew the windows all; And every soul cried out, "Well done!
Page 711 - And decks the lily fair in flowery pride, Would, in the way His wisdom sees the best, For them and for their little ones provide; But chiefly, in their hearts with grace divine preside.
Page 602 - A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales, that from ye blow, A momentary bliss bestow ; As, waving fresh their gladsome wing, My weary soul they seem to soothe; And, redolent of Joy and Youth, To breathe a second Spring!

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