Deafness practically illustrated: being an exposition of original views as to the causes and treatment of diseases of the ear (Google eBook)

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1857
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chapitre sur les ear trumpet page 187

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Page 196 - York, to consult me under the following circumstances:—He had been deaf from an early age, and on examination, I found great disorganization of the drum of each ear. On my remarking this to him, he replied, " How is it, then, that, by the most simple means, I can produce in the left ear a degree of hearing quite sufficient for all ordinary purposes; in fact, so satisfied am I with the improved hearing which I can myself produce, that I only desire your assistance on behalf of the other ear.
Page 202 - ... success. This case, like the first quoted, proved to be one in which there was a loss of a great portion of the membrana tympani ; and I may here observe, that all my experience tends to show that this is an essential condition of the ear for success. At the present time I can refer to not very far short of two hundred cases, in which the new treatment has been successful, and in all of which more or less perforation or destruction of the membrane exists. A very small quantity of wool is sufficient....
Page 197 - With little expectation of success, after so many previous failures, I was induced to apply the new remedy, with some modifications •upon my previous experiments. Instead of adopting my American patient's plan, it occurred to me to try the effect of a small pellet of moistened cotton wool, gently inserted and applied at the bottom of the mealus, so as to come in contact with the small portion of membrane which still remained.
Page 197 - ... try so simple a method in other cases. I did so in several which appeared to me to be identical with that of my patient, but I invariably failed. I was on the point of abandoning the idea that the remedy could ever be made available in practice, and of considering either that my American patient's case was unlike all others, or that it depended on some idiosyncrasy, when it happened that a young lady came under my care, by the recommendation of Mr. Squibb, surgeon, of Orchard-street. She was...
Page 198 - Such a manipulation would in most cases add to the deafness. It is essential to find the spot on which to place the wool, and so adjust it as to produce the best degree of hearing of which the case may happen to be susceptible. This of course differs according to the variety and extent of the disorganization. I quote the above case, not only because it was the first which it was my happiness to relieve by this novel plan, but because I am in a position to show the permanency of the remedy; for recently...
Page 218 - ... anteriorly, or posteriorly, according to the situation of the perforation and other circumstances connected with the case ; but care must be taken that the entire opening be not covered, otherwise the experiment will not succeed. It is also indispensable to success that the moisture of the wool should be preserved.
Page 50 - this has not the desired effect, and the person still remains deaf, the following instruments are made to open the Eustachian tube; if upon trial it should be found to be obstructed, the passage is to be lubricated by throwing a little warm water into it, by a syringe joined to a flexible silver tube, which is introduced through the nose into the oval opening of the duct, at the posterior opening of the nares, towards the arch of the palate.
Page 198 - ... passage, so as to come in contact with the small portion of membrane which still remained. The result was astoundingly successful. On the evening of a day in which she had risen from her bed with the sad reflection that she must be for ever debarred from social converse and enjoyment, she joined the family dinnerparty, and heard the conversation which was going on around her with a facility that appeared to all present quite miraculous.
Page 134 - It commonly begins with an altered state of the earwax, and a sense of dryuess and itching in the ears which impels the sufferer to pick the passage with pins, &c., and thus provoke, instead of ward off, the disorder. Protection of the passage from cold, and the use of a solution of nitrate of silver, two or three grains to the ounce, carefully applied with a camel-hair pencil, would generally stop an eardischarge in its incipient stag e.
Page 197 - This improvement would sometimes continue an hour, a day, or even a week, without requiring a repetition of the manipulation. Such an interesting fact could not fail to excite my attention, and it naturally occurred to me to try so simple a method in other cases. I did so in several which appeared to me to be identical with that of my patient, but I invariably failed. I was on the point of abandoning the idea that the remedy could ever...

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