A List of Pensioners of the War of 1812 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Byron N. Clark
Research publication Company, 1904 - Military pensions - 171 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
30
III
31
IV
47
V
53
VI
56
VII
63
VIII
71
IX
73
X
79

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Page 58 - At half past 10 o'clock, the Eagle not being able to bring her guns to bear, cut her cable, and anchored in a more eligible position, between my ship and the Ticonderoga, where she very much annoyed the enemy, but unfortunately, leaving me exposed to a galling fire from the enemy's brig. Our guns on the starboard side being nearly all dismounted, or not manageable, a stern anchor was let go, the bower cut, and the ship winded with a fresh broadside on the enemy's ship, which soon after surrendered.
Page 57 - ... country, and the honor of my profession, will oblige me to have recourse to those measures which thousands of either nation may hereafter have cause to regret, and which, I solemnly appeal to God, I have used my utmost endeavors to arrest. " I have the honor to be, sir, with much respect, your most obedient and very humble servant, WILLIAM CAMPBELL, " Major 24th Regiment, Commanding at Fort Miami.
Page 58 - Our guns on the starboard side being nearly all dismounted, or not manageable, a stern anchor was let go, the bower cable cut, and the ship winded with a fresh broadside on the enemy's ship, which soon after surrendered. Our broadside was then sprung to bear on the brig, which surrendered in about 15 minutes after.
Page 57 - In this situation, the whole force, on both sides, became engaged, the Saratoga suffering much from the heavy fire of the Confiance. I could perceive, at the same time, however, that our fire was very destructive to her.
Page 58 - Our galleys were about obeying with alacrity the signal to follow them, when all the vessels were reported to me to be in a sinking state. It then became necessary to annul the signal to the galleys, and order their men to the pumps. I could only look at the enemy's galleys going off in a shattered condition; for there was not a mast in either squadron that could stand to make sail on.
Page 53 - An army amounting to fourteen thousand men completely equipped and accompanied by a numerous train of artillery, and all the engines of war men who had conquered in France, Spain, Portugal, the Indies, and in various other parts of the...
Page 59 - The absence and sickness of lieutenant Raymond Perry, left me without the services of that excellent officer; much ought fairly to be attributed to him for his great care and attention in disciplining the ship's crew, as her first lieutenant. His place was filled by a gallant young officer, lieutenant Peter Gamble, who, I regret to inform you, was killed early in the action.
Page 58 - ... going off in a shattered condition, for there was not a mast in either squadron that could stand to make sail on; the lower rigging, being nearly all shot away, hung down as though it had been just placed over the mast heads.
Page 54 - Saranack at three different points to assault the works. At the upper ford he was met by the Militia and Volunteers, and after repeated attempts was driven back with considerable loss in killed, wounded and prisoners. At the Bridge near the Village he was repulsed by the pickets and brave riflemen under Captain Grovenor and Lts.
Page 53 - Head, and at 9 engaged our flotilla, at anchor in the bay of the town, fully confident of crushing in an instant the whole of our naval force ; but the gallant Commodore Macdonough, in the short space of two hours, obliged the large vessels to strike their colors, whilst the galleys saved themselves by flight.

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