Music of the Old South: Colony to Confederacy (Google eBook)

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, Jan 1, 1972 - Music - 349 pages
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Each chapter covers a specific period of the eighteenth or nineteenth century, and major areas of activity examined include music on public and social occasions, music merchantry and instruction, concerts, the theater, and music of the church. 42 photographic reproductions.
  

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Contents

Music in Colonial Virginia
15
Music Activities Before 1750
16
MidEighteenth Century Through the Revolution
28
The Emergence of a New Center of Music Culture 17801799
52
Music on Social and Public Occasions
53
Music Merchantry and Instruction
57
The Theatre
63
Concerts
79
Concerts
153
Music of the Church
166
Music in a Capital City of the South 18461865
179
Music on Social and Public Occasions
180
The Theatre
184
Theatrical Entertainments in Auditoriums
191
Concerts
198
Music of the Church
233

Music of the Church
84
Richmond as a Center for Music The Early Years 18001825
90
Music on Public and Social Occasions
91
Music Merchantry and Instruction
97
Music of the Theatre
103
Concerts
117
Music of the Church
124
A New Generation Twenty Years of Musical Development 18261845
134
Music on Social and Public Occasions
135
Music Merchantry and Instruction
137
Music of the Theatre
141
In Retrospect
246
European Influences on the Souths Cultural Development Noted
247
Musical Leadership in Richmond Disclosed
251
Social Predilection Toward Musical Events Revealed
252
In Conclusion
253
Appendixes
255
B Selected Programs Representative of Concerts in Richmond 17971865
260
Bibliography
326
Index
335
Copyright

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Page 24 - That a violin be played for by 20 Fiddlers ; no person to have the liberty of playing unless he bring a fiddle with him. After the prize is won they are all to play together, and each a different tune, and to be treated by the company.
Page 15 - We have no townships. Our country being much intersected with navigable waters, and trade brought generally to our doors, instead of our being obliged to go in quest of it, has probably been one of the causes why we have no towns of any consequence.
Page 24 - That a pair of handsome Shoes be danced for. " 'That a pair of handsome silk Stockings of one Pistole value be given to the handsomest young country maid...

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