A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, with Lists of Their Works: In Two Volumes.. (Google eBook)

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R. and J. Dodsley in Pallmall; and J. Graham in the Strand., 1759 - Authors - 247 pages
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Page 107 - ONE of those divine men, who, like a chapel in a palace, remain unprofaned, while all the rest is tyranny, corruption, and folly...
Page 96 - ... of King William. He had as much wit as his first master, or his contemporaries, Buckingham and Rochester ; without the royal want of feeling, the Duke's want of principles, or the Earl's want of thought. The latter said with astonishment, ' That he did not know how it was, but Lord Dorset might do any thing, and yet was never to blame...
Page 96 - He was the finest gentleman in the voluptuous court of Charles the Second, and in the gloomy one of King William. He had as much wit as his first master, or his contemporaries, Buckingham and Rochester ; without the royal want of feeling, the Duke's want of principles, or the Earl's want of thought.
Page 131 - With attachment to no party, though with talents to govern any party, this lively man changed the free air of Westminster for the gloom of the Escurial, the prospect of King George's garter for the Pretender's ; and, with indifference to all religion, the frolic lord, who had writ the ballad on the Archbishop of Canterbury, died in the habit of a capuchin.
Page 126 - Yet even particularities were becoming in him, as he had a natural ease that immediately adopted and saved from the air of affectation.
Page 193 - I have been bullied by an usurper; I have been neglected by a court ; but I will not be dictated to by a subject : your man shan't stand. " ANNE Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery.
Page 43 - Muses were fond to inspire, and ashamed to avow, and who practised without the least reserve that secret which can make verses more read for their defects than for their merits. The art is neither commendable nor difficult. Moralists proclaim loudly that there is no wit in indecency: It is very true: Indecency is far from conferring wit; but it does not destroy it neither. Lord Rochester's poems have much more obscenity than wit, more wit than poetry, more poetry than politeness.
Page 199 - Duchess, who, like the proud Duke of Espernon, lived to brave the successors in a court where she had domineered, wound up her capricious life, where it seems she had begun it, with an apology for her conduct. The piece, though weakened by the prudence of those who were to correct it, though maimed by her Grace's own corrections, and though great part of it is rather the annals of a wardrobe than of a reign, yet has still curious anecdotes, and a few of those sallies of wit which fourscore years...
Page 141 - He wrote against the late king, who had forgiven him ; against sir Robert Walpole, who did forgive him ; against the Pretender and the clergy, who never will forgive him. He is one of our best writers; though his attacks on all governments and all religions (neither of which views he cared directly to own) have necessarily involved his style in a want of perspicuity.
Page 125 - He was one of those men of careless wit and negligent grace, who scatter a thousand bon-mots and idle verses, which we painful compilers gather and hoard, till the authors stare to find themselves authors. Such was this lord, of an advantageous figure and enterprising spirit ; as gallant as Amadis and as brave ; but a little more expeditious in his journeys : for he is said to have seen more kings and more postilions than any man in Europe He was a man, as his friend said, who would neither live...

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