The Rural Magazine and Farmer's Monthly Museum, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Samuel Putnam Waldo
J. & W. Russell, 1819 - Agriculture
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Page 50 - And every plant of the field before it was in the earth and every herb of the field before it grew for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth and there was not a man to till the ground...
Page 46 - De la Place, who was undressed, .demanded the surrender of the fort. ' By what authority do you demand it.'' inquired the astonished commander. ' I demand it (said Allen) in the name of the great Jehovah and of the continental Congress.
Page 25 - The embarrassments which have obstructed the progress of our external trade, have led to serious reflections on the necessity of enlarging the sphere of our domestic commerce. The restrictive regulations, which, in foreign markets abridge the vent of the increasing surplus of our agricultural produce, serve to beget an earnest desire, that a more extensive demand for that surplus may be created at home...
Page 71 - A hundred men with each a pen, Or more upon my word, sir, It is most true would be too few, Their valor to record, sir.
Page 25 - ... surplus of our agricultural produce, serve to beget an earnest desire, that a more extensive demand for that surplus may be created at home ; and the complete success which has rewarded manufacturing enterprise, in some valuable branches, conspiring with the promising symptoms which attend some less mature essays in others, justify a hope, that the obstacles to the growth of this species of industry are less formidable than they were apprehended to be ; and that it is not difficult to find, in...
Page 170 - Paper an unsullied sheet, On which the happy man, whom fate ordains, May write his name, and take her for his pains. One instance more, and only one, I'll bring : 'Tis the Great Man who scorns a little thing, Whose thoughts, whose deeds, whose maxims...
Page 25 - ... favorable to the freedom and independence of the human mind one, perhaps, most conducive to the multiplication of the human species; has intrinsically a strong claim to pre-eminence over every other kind of industry.
Page 88 - Americans will pay, which the exhausted state of the continent renders very unlikely ; and because it was well worth while to incur a loss upon the first exportation, in order, by the glut, to stifle in the cradle those rising manufactures in the United States, which the war had forced into existence contrary to the natural course of things.
Page 42 - ... be within the space of three English miles to the northward of the said river called Monomack, alias Merrimac, or to the northward of any and every part thereof, and all lands and hereditaments whatsoever lying within the limits aforesaid, north and south in latitude and breadth, and in length and longitude of and within all the breadth aforesaid, throughout the main lands there, from the Atlantic and Western Sea and Ocean on the east part, to the South Sea on the west part...
Page 134 - Universal silence was observed amidst the vast concourse, and the utmost decency prevailed: exhibiting in demeanor an awful sense of the vicissitudes of human life, mingled with commiseration for the unhappy.

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