Londiniana: Or, Reminiscences of the British Metropolis, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Page 279 - Nobles, clad in cloth of silver, gold, and velvet ; the windows and balconies, all set with ladies ; trumpets, music, and myriads of people flocking, even so far as from Rochester, so as they were seven hours in passing the city, even from two in the afternoon till nine at night.
Page 112 - ... twere in anger, suddenly snatch at the middle of the inside, if it be taffeta at the least; and so, by that means, your costly lining is betrayed, or else by the pretty advantage of compliment. But one note by the way do I especially woo you to, the neglect of which makes many of our gallants cheap and ordinary, that by no means you be seen above four turns ; but in the fifth make yourself away, either in some of the semsters...
Page 276 - I went, and Mr. Mansell, and one of the King's footmen, and a dog that the King loved, in a boat by ourselves, and so got on shore when the King did, who was received by General Monk with all imaginable love and respect at his entrance upon the land of Dover. Infinite the crowd of people and the horsemen, citizens, and noblemen of all sorts. The Mayor of the town came and gave him his white staff, the badge of his place, which the King did give him again. The Mayor also presented him from the town...
Page 26 - Let me or float or sink, be high or low: Or let me live with some more sweet content. Or die, and so forget what love e'er meant.
Page 112 - ... but bend your course directly in the middle line, that the whole body of the church may appear to be yours ; where, in view of all, you may publish your suit in what manner you affect most, either with the slide of your cloak from the one shoulder ; and then you must, as 'twere in anger, suddenly snatch at the middle of the inside, if it be...
Page 269 - Here out of the window it was a most pleasant sight to see the City from one end to the other with a glory about it, so high was the light of the bonfires, and so thick round the City, and the bells rang everywhere.
Page 175 - Not far from that most celebrated place,* Where angry Justice shows her awful face ; Where little villains must submit to fate, That great ones may enjoy the world in state; There stands a dome, majestic to the sight, And sumptuous arches bear its oval height ; A golden globe, placed high with artful skill, Seems, to the distant sight, a gilded pill.
Page 314 - And all who knew those Dunces to reward. Amid that area wide they took their stand, Where the tall May-pole once o'erlook'd the Strand, But now (so ANNE and Piety ordain) A Church collects the saints of Drury-lane. With Authors, Stationers obey'd the call (The field of glory is a field for all). Glory, and gain, th' industrious tribe provoke; And gentle Dulness ever loves a joke.
Page 115 - It is more than this, the whole world's map, which you may here discern in its perfectest motion, justling and turning. It is a heap of stones and men, with a vast confusion of languages; and were the steeple not sanctified, nothing liker Babel.
Page 310 - I now took them to Westminster Abbey and there did show them all the tombs very finely, having one with us alone, there being other company this day to see the tombs, it being Shrove Tuesday ; and here we did see, by particular favour, the body of Queen Katherine of Valois ; 1 and I had the upper part of her body in my hands, and I did kiss her mouth...

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