Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies' Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (Google eBook)

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Mar 3, 2008 - History - 304 pages
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Immediately after the Civil War, white women across the South organized to retrieve the remains of Confederate soldiers. In Virginia alone, these Ladies' Memorial Associations (LMAs) relocated and reinterred the remains of more than 72,000 soldiers. Challenging the notion that southern white women were peripheral to the Lost Cause movement until the 1890s, Caroline Janney restores these women as the earliest creators and purveyors of Confederate tradition. Long before national groups such as the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the United Daughters of the Confederacy were established, Janney shows, local LMAs were earning sympathy for defeated Confederates. Her exploration introduces new ways in which gender played a vital role in shaping the politics, culture, and society of the late nineteenth-century South.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Virginia Women in the Confederacy
15
The Origins of Virginias Ladies Memorial Associations 18651866
39
Ladies Memorial Associations during Radical Reconstruction 18671870
69
Challenges for the Ladies Memorial Associations 18701883
105
The Memorial Associations Renaissance 18831893
133
United Daughters and Confederated Ladies 18941915
167
A Mixed Legacy
195
Appendix
201
Notes
203
Bibliography
257
Index
271
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Caroline E. Janney is associate professor of history at Purdue University.

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