Pretty Good Joke Book

Front Cover
HighBridge Company, 2005 - Humor - 320 pages
24 Reviews
A treasury of hilarity from one of America’s favorite radio shows.

A guy walks into a bar. Eight Canada Geese walk into a bar. A termite jumps up on the bar and asks, “Where is the bar tender?” Drum roll.

The Fifth Edition of the perennially popular Pretty Good Joke Book is everything the first four were and more. More puns, one-liners, light bulb jokes, knock-knock jokes, and third-grader jokes (have you heard the one about Elvis Parsley?). More religion jokes, political jokes, lawyer jokes, blonde jokes, and jokes in questionable taste (Why did the urologist lose his license? He got in trouble with his peers). More jokes about chickens, relationships, and senior moments (The nice thing about Alzheimer’s is you can enjoy the same jokes again and again).

It all started back in 1996, when A Prairie Home Companion fans laughed themselves silly during the first Joke Show. The broadcast was such a hit that it became an almost-annual gagfest. Then fans wanted to read the jokes, share them, and pass them around, and the first Pretty Good Joke Book was born. With 362 new jokes (more or less), the latest edition promises countless giggles, chortles, and guffaws anyone—fans of the radio show or not—will enjoy.

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The Best Joke book EVER!!!!!!

Review: Pretty Good Joke Book (Pretty Good Jokes)

User Review  - Stan Lambchop - Goodreads

I bought this book in the hope for an engaging and enveloping read. I was disappointed to find how the author must constantly link his jokes to a neo-Marxist regime, eg 'why did the chicken cross the ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
IN BAD TASTE
223
POWER TO THE PEOPLE
254
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Humorist Garrison Keillor was born Gary Edward Keillor in Anoka, Minnesota on August 7, 1942. He began using the pen name Garrison at the age of thirteen. He received a B.A. from the University of Minnesota in 1966 and paid for his tuition by working at the campus radio station. In 1974, he wrote an essay for the New Yorker about the Grand Ole Opry, which led to his live radio program, A Prairie Home Companion. Stories from Prairie Home were collected and published, but his debut as a novelist was in 1985 with Lake Wobegon Days. His other novels include WLT: A Radio Romance, The Book of Guys, Wobegon Boy, Me by Jimmy (Big Boy) Valente, and Good Poems, American Places. He has also written the children's books Cat, You Better Come Home, The Old Man Who Loved Cheese, and The Sandy Bottom Orchestra. He won a Grammy Award for his recording of Lake Wobegon Days and was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1994. Keillor received a National Humanities Medal from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1999. In September 2007, Keillor was awarded the John Steinbeck Award.

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