The United States in Central America, 1860-1911: Episodes of Social Imperialism and Imperial Rivalry in the World System

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Duke University Press, 1991 - Political Science - 253 pages
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In a work of unprecedented scope, Thomas D. Schoonover combines exhaustive multicountry archival research with a sophisticated theoretical framework grounded in world systems theory to elucidate the relations between the United States and Central America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Schoonover’s archival research in Central America, Europe, and the United States encompasses public, business, organizational, and individual records. In analyzing this material, Schoonover applies a world systems theory approach with that of social imperialism and dependency theory to underscore the broad, multistate dimension of international affairs. In exploring the international history of Central America, Schoonover describes the role of personalities such as John C. Frémont, Otto von Bismarck, Theodore Roosevelt, Manuel Estrada Cabrera, and José Santos Zelaya; the impact of railroad building and canal projects; and the role of pan-Americanism, nationalism, racism, and anti-Americanism.
  

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Contents

Coming to Grips
13
John C Fremont Otto von Bismarck
28
George McWillie Williamson and Postbellum Southern
46
Tables
50
German and U S Rivalry in Central
62
From
77
Morality and Political Purpose in Theodore Roosevelts Actions
97
The World Economic Crisis Racism and U S Relations with
111
An Isthmian Canal and the U S Overthrow of Nicaraguan
130
Economic Opportunity and AntiAmericanism
149
Conclusion
166
Abbreviations
180
Sources
219
Index
243
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Page 224 - Department of State, The United States and Nicaragua: A Survey of the Relations from 1909 to 1932 (Washington, DC , 1932).

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About the author (1991)

Thomas Schoonover, Sagrera Professor of History at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, is the author of a number of books, including The Banana Men: American Mercenaries and Entrepreneurs in Central America, 1880-1930. He lives in Lafayette, Louisiana.

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