St. Philip's (Google eBook)

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Charles Scribner, 1871 - 340 pages
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Page 114 - It is a beauteous evening, calm and free, The holy time is quiet as a Nun Breathless with adoration; the broad sun Is sinking down in its tranquillity; The gentleness of heaven broods o'er the Sea: Listen!
Page 346 - Examiner in the University of St. Andrews. With an Introduction by Dr. LEONHARD SCHMITZ, and a copious Index of the whole four volumes, prepared especially for this edition.
Page 140 - O! many a shaft at random sent Finds mark the archer little meant! And many a word at random spoken May soothe or wound a heart that's broken!
Page 82 - Lets in new light through chinks that Time has made: Stronger by weakness, wiser, men become As they draw near to their eternal home. Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view That stand upon the threshold of the new.
Page 64 - Proud Maisie is in the wood, Walking so early. Sweet Robin sits on the bush, Singing so rarely. 'Tell me, thou bonny bird, When shall I marry me? ' 'When six braw gentlemen Kirkward shall carry ye.
Page 346 - A work of the very highest merit ; its learning is exact, and profound ; its narrative fuD of genius and skill ; its descriptions of men are admirably vivid. We wish to place on record our opinion that Dr. Mommsen's is by far the best history of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Commonwealth.
Page 346 - Dr. MOMMSEN has long been known and appreciated through his researches into the languages, laws, and institutions of Ancient Rome and Italy, as the most thoroughly versed scholar now living in these departments of historical investigation. To a wonderfully...
Page 346 - Republic, taking the work on the whole the author's complete mastery of his subject, the variety of his gifts and acquirements, his graphic power in the delineation of natural and individual character, and the vivid interest which he inspires in every portion of his book. He is without an equal in his own sphere.
Page 75 - Thou little Child, yet glorious in the might Of heaven-born freedom on thy being's height, Why with such earnest pains dost thou provoke The years to bring the inevitable yoke, Thus blindly with thy blessedness at strife? Full soon thy Soul shall have her earthly freight, And custom lie upon thee with a weight, Heavy as frost, and deep almost as life!
Page 346 - Since the days of Niebuhr, no work on Roman History has appeared that combines so much to attract, instruct, and charm the reader. Its style a rare quality in a German author is vigorous, spirited, and animated. Professor Mommsen's work can stand a comparison with the noblest productions of modern history.

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