Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2000 - Health & Fitness - 284 pages
8 Reviews
Consequently, people who suffer from chronic fatigue, chronic pain, and many other miseries often endure not only the ailment but dismissive and negative reactions from others. Since its first publication, Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired has offered hope and coping strategies to thousands of people who suffer from ICI. Paul Donoghue and Mary Siegel teach their readers how to rethink how they themselves view their illness and how to communicate with loved ones and doctors in a way that meets their needs. The authors' understanding makes readers feel they have been heard for the first time. For this edition, the authors include a new introduction drawing on the experiences of the many people who have responded to the book and to their lectures and television appearances. They expand the definition of ICI to include other ailments such as depression, addiction, and obsessive-compulsive disorders. They bring the resource material, including Web sites, up to the present, and they offer fresh insights on four topics that often emerge: guilt, how ICI affects the family, meaningfulness, and defining acceptance.
  

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Review: Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness

User Review  - Ruby - Goodreads

This wasn't terrible, but it wasn't the best book on chronic illness that I have read. I found it a little repetitive and heavy on obvious advice, like 'try to find a way to do some exercise' or 'find ... Read full review

Review: Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness

User Review  - Lynda - Goodreads

Has some excellent info, but it also has some that I found questionable. Read full review

Contents

Introduction to Invisible Chronic Illness
3
The Baffling Forms of ICI
12
The Psychological Consequences of ICI
29
Three Dimensions of ICI and Their
39
Being Chronically 111
55
Seeking Answers Seeking Cures
72
Consulting a Doctor
79
Relating with Family Friends
89
Identifying Your Story
152
Getting and Keeping the Attention of the HealthCare System
160
Coping with ICI in the Family
171
Saying What You Feel
187
Hearing What Is Said
207
Managing Stress Associated with ICI
223
Notes
241
Authors Recommended Reading List
248

Coping with Invisible Chronic Illness
95
Thinking Clearly
105
Irrational Thinking and ICI
116
Using Imagery to Confront Irrational Thinking
129
Living Your Story
140
General Reading List on Illnesses
252
Illness Associations
257
Index
269
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Paul J. Donoghue, S.M., Ph.D., is a nbsp;psychologist in private practice in Stamford, Connecticut.

Mary E. Siegel , Ph.D., is a psychologist in private practice in Stamford, Connecticut.

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