New Elegant Extracts: A Unique Selection ... from the Most Eminent Prose and Epistolary Writers ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C.& C. Whittingham, 1827 - English literature
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 206 - Keep innocency, and take heed unto the thing that is right : for that shall bring a man peace at the last.
Page 208 - Thou makest him to have dominion of the works of thy hands, and Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet...
Page 23 - My lord, when I lost the freedom of my cell, which was my college, yet I found some degree of it in my quiet country parsonage ; but I am weary of the noise and oppositions of this place, and indeed God and nature did not intend me for contentions, but for study and quietness.
Page 253 - Man alone seems to be the only creature who has arrived to the natural size in this poor soil. Every part of the country presents the same dismal landscape. No grove nor brook lend their music to cheer the stranger, or make the inhabitants forget their poverty.
Page 140 - I have great love and regard towards you, and desire to win and gain your love and friendship by a kind, just, and peaceable life ; and the people I send are of the same mind, and shall, in all things, behave themselves accordingly...
Page 155 - I breed them all up to learning, beyond my fortune ; but they are too hopeful to be neglected, though I want. Be pleased to look on me with an eye of compassion : some small employment would render my condition easy.
Page 23 - I believe him to be a good man ; and that belief hath occasioned me to examine mine own conscience concerning his opinions.
Page 17 - Follow the steps of your master Christ, and take up your cross. Lay your sins on his back, and always embrace him. And as touching my death, rejoice as I do, good sister, that I shall be delivered of this corruption, and put on incorruption, for I am assured that I shall, for losing of a mortal life, win...
Page 17 - Lord: be penitent for your sins, and yet despair not: be strong in faith, yet presume not; and desire with St. Paul to be dissolved and to be with Christ, with whom, even in death there is life. Be like the good servant, and even at midnight be waking, lest when death cometh and stealeth upon you, like a thief in the night, you be with the...
Page 66 - I thank you for the last regalo you gave me at your musceum, and for the good company. I heard you censur'd lately at Court, that you have lighted too foul upon Sir Inigo, and that you write with a porcupine's quill dipt in too much gall. Excuse me that I am so free with you, it is because I am in no common way of friendship.

Bibliographic information