The Fatal Strain: On the Trail of Avian Flu and the Coming Pandemic (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Nov 12, 2009 - Science - 416 pages
6 Reviews
A riveting account of why science alone can't stop the next pandemic.

In 2009, Swine Flu reminded us that pandemics still happen, and award- winning journalist Alan Sipress reminds us that far worse could be brewing. When a highly lethal strain of avian flu broke out in Asia in 2003 and raced westward, Sipress, as a reporter for The Washington Post, tracked the virus across nine countries, watching its secrets elude the world's brightest scientists and most intrepid disease hunters. A vivid portrayal of the struggle between man and microbe, The Fatal Strain is a fast-moving account that weaves cultural, political, and scientific strands into a tale of inevitable pandemic.


  

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Review: The Fatal Strain: On the Trail of Avian Flu and the Coming Pandemic

User Review  - Zoe Fedderson - Goodreads

I never though I'd read a 400 page non-fiction book about epidemiology and say I actually enjoyed it, but that did just happened people. I can't help but be amazed how Alan writes, It's like he's ... Read full review

Review: The Fatal Strain: On the Trail of Avian Flu and the Coming Pandemic

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

Despite Tony's assertion that this sounds like a book about serious constipation, it is a pretty fascinating and disturbing read. The inevitability of a flu pandemic and how close we've already come ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
A Visitation from Outer Space
The Elephant and the Lotus Leaf
Into the Volcano
Livestock Revolution
From a Single Spark
Cockfighting and Karma
Sitting on Fire
The Secret Call
Lets Go Save the World
The Lights Go Out at Seven
Peril on the Floodplain
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Alan Sipress is economics editor at The Washington Post and a longtime foreign correspondent, based most recently in Southeast Asia. In 2005, a Post team he anchored was awarded the Jesse Laventhol Prize for Deadline Writing for coverage of the South Asian tsunami. This is his first book. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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