The Dialogues of Plato, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Clarendon Press, 1871
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Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Garrett Starr - Goodreads

I have always wanted this collection, but over the years I purchased other books instead. When our church moved into our current digs, this entire collection was hidden away in a back room and covered ... Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Pete Skimin - Goodreads

Picked up this entire set in excellent condition at a library sponsored used book sale for $60.00. hands down one of my best finds. Read full review

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Page 425 - Begin to cast a beam on the outward shape, The unpolluted temple of the mind, And turns it, by degrees, to the soul's essence, Till all be made immortal : but when lust, By unchaste looks, loose gestures, and foul talk, But most by lewd and lavish act of sin, Lets in defilement to the inward parts, The soul grows clotted by contagion, Imbodies, and imbrutes, till she quite lose The divine property of her first being.
Page 464 - Crito, I owe a cock to Asclepius; will you remember to pay the debt? The debt shall be paid said Crito, is there anything else?
Page 611 - Beloved Pan, and all ye other gods who haunt this place, give me beauty in the inward soul; and may the outward and inward man be at one. May I reckon the wise to be the wealthy, and may I have such a quantity of gold as a temperate man and he only can bear and carry.
Page 234 - ... an invention of the Muses, as he himself says. For in this way the God would seem to indicate to us and not allow us to doubt that these beautiful poems are not human, or the work of man, but divine and the work of God; and that the poets are only the interpreters of the Gods by whom they are severally possessed.
Page 9 - persuade you to cure the head, until he has first given you his soul to be cured by the charm. For this," he said, " is the great error of our day in the treatment of the human body, that physicians separate the soul from the body.
Page 463 - Crito made a sign to the servant, who was standing by; and he went out, and having been absent for some time, returned with the jailer carrying the cup of poison. Socrates said: "You, my good friend, who are experienced in these matters, shall give me directions how I am to proceed.
Page 332 - I went to one man after another, being not unconscious of the enmity which I provoked, and I lamented and feared this: But necessity was laid upon me,— the word of God, I thought, ought to be considered first. And I said to myself, Go I must to all who appear to know, and find out the meaning of the oracle. And I swear to you, Athenians, by the dog I swear! —for I must tell you the truth — the result of my mission was just this: I found that the men most in repute were all but the most foolish;...
Page 339 - There you are mistaken : a man who is good for anything ought not to calculate the chance of living or dying; he ought only to consider whether in doing anything he is doing right or wrong — acting the part of a good man or of a bad.
Page 351 - But if death is the journey to another place, and there, as men say, all the dead are, what good, O my friends and judges, can be greater than this? If indeed when the pilgrim arrives in the world below, he is delivered from the professors...
Page 423 - Yet once more consider the matter in this light: When the soul and the body are united, then nature orders the soul to rule and govern, and the body to obey and serve. Now which of these two functions is akin to the divine? and which to the mortal? Does not the divine appear to you to be that which naturally orders and rules, and the mortal that which is subject and servant? True.

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