Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism (New Edition)

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, Sep 17, 2002 - Business & Economics - 220 pages
6 Reviews

Walter LaFeber's timely analysis looks at the ways that triumphant capitalism, coupled with high-tech telecommunications, is conquering the nations of the world, one mind—one pair of feet—at a time.

With Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism, Walter LaFeber has written a biography, a social history, and a far-ranging economic critique. From basketball prodigy to international phenomenon to seductive commercial ideal, Michael Jordan is the supreme example of how American corporations have used technology in a brave, massively wired new world to sell their products in every corner of the globe. LaFeber's examination of Nike and its particular dominion over the global marketplace is often scathing, while his fascinating mini-biography of Michael Jordan and the commercial history of basketball reveal much about American society. For this new paperback edition, LaFeber has added a chapter on globalization in a changed world, after mass protests and since September 11. "Bold, riveting....Brilliantly illuminates how hyper-US capitalism has spread its financial wings around the globe."—Douglas Brinkley "LaFeber brings an impressive intellect to bear on his subject."—Barbara Rudolph, Chicago Tribune
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
2
3 stars
1
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism

User Review  - Rainey - Goodreads

LaFeber's short critique of the effects of capitalism on global economics came across my desk on a reading list in college. I found his insights on marketing and branding as tools more powerful than war in spreading political idealologies to be both readable and intriguing. Read full review

Review: Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism

User Review  - Dakota Fabro - Goodreads

Interesting! Paints Michael Jordan in a bad light... which is sad because I always thought he was awesome... but now... not so much. haha Read full review

Contents

A Century of Preparation
27
The North Carolina Legacy
29
The Naismith Legacy
33
The Legacy of the Harlem Rens and Dr J
41
The Globalization of Michael Jordan
49
Enter the Transnational Corporation
54
Enter the Swoosh
57
Enter the Communication Satellite
67
Tragedy
119
Baseball Interlude
121
The Return
126
The Greatest Endorser of the Twentieth Century or An Insidious Form of Imperialism?
130
Expanding the Empire
133
The Swooshifying of the World
143
Implications and Conclusions
151
September 11 and After The Struggle over the New Global Capitalism
165

Bittersweet Championships
75
Selling a Championship
78
Basketball Is My EscapeEverything Else Is So Complicated
83
New Frontiers and Inner Cities
90
Gambling and the Media
96
The 1992 Olympics
99
Theres No Telling What Can Happen to the Business If China Truly Catches On
102
The Higher the Satellite the Lower the Culture?
109
A Faustian Bargain
113
But Nothing Was Normal Anymore
170
Where and Why the New Global Capitalism Failed and the Tragic Results
174
The US Response Or Are the New Technologies and American Democracy Compatible?
181
The New Global Capitalism after September 11
186
Acknowledgments
189
Notes
191
Selected Bibliography
207
Index
213
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - ... and racially snobbish. I believe at last in the white man's burden. We are as far above the modern Frenchman as he is above the Negro. Even in art! Italy has no one. When Anatole France dies French literature will be a silly jealous rehashing of technical quarrels. They're thru and done. You may have spoken in jest about New York as the capital of culture but in 25 years it will be just as London is now. Culture follows money and all the refinements of aestheticism can't stave off its change...
Page 20 - The Americans are acting, in the absence of limits put to them by anybody or anything, as if they own a blank check in their 'Me World.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Walter LaFeber is Marie Underhilll Noll Professor of History and a Steven Weiss Presidential Teaching Fellow at Cornell University.

Bibliographic information