The Protocol of the Gods: A Study of the Kasuga Cult in Japanese History (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Dec 15, 1992 - Religion - 295 pages
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"The Protocol of the Gods" is a pioneering study of the history of relations between Japanese native institutions (Shinto shrines) and imported Buddhist institutions (Buddhist temples). Using the Kasuga Shinto shrine and the Kofukuji Buddhist temple, one of the oldest and largest of the shrine-temple complexes, Allan Grapard characterizes what he calls the combinatory character of pre-modern Japanese religiosity. He argues that Shintoism and Buddhism should not be studied in isolation, as hitherto supposed. Rather, a study of the individual and shared characteristics of their respective origins, evolutions, structures, and practices can serve as a model for understanding the pre-modern Japanese religious experience. Spanning the years from a period before historical records to the forcible separation of the Kasuga-Kofukuji complex by the Meiji government in 1868, Grapard presents a wealth of little-known material. He includes translations of rare texts and provides new, accessible translations of familiar documents.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
The Study of Japanese Cultic Centers
3
A Morphology of Cultural Systems
11
Organization of the Book
13
THE CREATION OF CEREMONIAL CENTER
15
The Ceremonial Center
19
The Ujidera Phenomenon
20
The Creation of the Kasuga Shrine
25
Rites of the Sacred City
148
Echoes of Camphorated Maritime Music
151
The Kasuga Grand Rite
155
A Provincial Matter
157
Pleasurable Visions
167
The World of the Monzeki
171
THE EXPERIENCE OF TRANSCENDENCE IN KASUGA
186
The Sacred Space of the Shrine
187

Enigmatic Identities
29
The Organization of the Shrine
44
The Creation of the Kofukuji
48
Ceremonies and Ritual Assemblies of the Multiples
57
Ideation Only at the Kofukuji
64
Constructs of the Mind
68
KASUGA DAIMYOJIN PROTECTOR OR RULER?
71
The Jinguji Phenomenon
72
Association between Kami and BuddhasBodhisativas
74
The Kasuga Associations
82
Kasuga Daimyojin
93
From Ceremonial Center to Sacred City
97
The Medieval Organization of the Kasuga Shrine
100
The Medieval Organization of the Kofukuji
106
Economic Considerations
114
Governance and Police
116
POROTOCOL SOCIOCOSMIC ORGANON
119
The Territorial Imperative
123
Growth of Ritualized Violence
137
The Price of Time Renewed
141
Sociocosmic Inscription in Space
197
Orientation of Human Beings in Space
200
Kasuga a Cosmology Embodied in Nature
202
Buddhist Cosmography and Cosmology
203
Buddha Land
206
The Combinatory Process
208
Pure Land and Sacred Province
216
The Experience of Time in Kasuga
219
Space Time Ritual and Performance
227
IdeationOnly and a Few Other Things
229
FROM CULT TO CULTURAL REVOLUTION
237
Political Expediencies
241
Early Marks of Dissociation
244
The Year of Cultural Transvestivism
249
Is Kasuga a Model of All Japanese Multiplexes?
256
Notes
259
Bibliography
279
Index
287
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About the author (1992)

Allan G. Grapard is Associate Professor of Religion at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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