The works of the learned Benjamin Whichcote ... (Google eBook)

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printed by J. Chalmers, for Alexander Thomson, 1751 - Religion
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a pastor and a doctor
It is difficult to deny, regardless of the overarching themes between divines, cambridge platonists and deist, that Whichcote provides some valuable moral insight into christian
living. The first chapter entitled "The shortness of Charity," (case study of Jonah) and one finds many practical thoughts from Whichcote. I had never heard of many of these figures until just a while back. Whichcote is credited with founding the English Deist movement and this is a good introductory text to his works. 

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Page 269 - Pharaoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage are an hundred and thirty years ; few and evil have the days of the years of my life been...
Page 275 - God ; who will render to every man according to his deeds : to them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honour and immortality, eternal life : but unto them that are contentious, and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath, tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil...
Page 179 - And Jezebel his wife said unto him, Dost thou now govern the kingdom of Israel? arise, and eat bread, and let thine heart be merry : I will give thee the vineyard of Naboth the Jezreelite.
Page 4 - And God saw their works, that they turned from their evil way; and God repented of the evil that he had said that he would do unto them; and he did it not.
Page 271 - ... as when an arrow is shot at a mark, it parteth the air, which immediately cometh together again; so that a man cannot know where it went through...
Page 25 - Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; And see ye indeed, but perceive not. Make the heart of this people fat, And make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; Lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, And understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.
Page 119 - Therefore also now, saith the Lord, turn ye even to me with all your heart, and with fasting and with weeping, and with mourning ; and rend your hearts and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God ; for He is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and of great kindness, and repenteth Him of the evil.
Page 240 - Who hath woe ? who hath sorrow ? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause ? who hath redness of eyes ? They that tarry long at the wine ; they that go to seek mixed wine.
Page 282 - What could have been done more to my vineyard, That I have not done in it? Wherefore, when I looked that it should bring forth grapes, Brought it forth wild grapes?
Page 361 - ... to be throughout rational in what they do ; for these things have a Divine foundation. The spirit in man is the Candle of the Lord, lighted by God, and lighting men to God.

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JSTOR: The Cambridge Platonists
2 eg The Works of the Learned Benjamin Whichcote, dd (Aberdeen, 1751), i. 154-5, and Eight Letters of Dr Antony Tuckney, and Dr Benjamin Whichcote, ed. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0034-6551(197208)2%3A23%3A91%3C353%3ATCP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-G

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