Recollections of an old musician (Google eBook)

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E.P. Dutton & company, 1899 - Musicians - 274 pages
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Page 154 - FLAG of the heroes who left us their glory, Borne through their battle-fields' thunder and flame, Blazoned in song and illumined in story, Wave o'er us all who inherit their fame ! Up with our banner bright, Sprinkled with starry light, Spread its fair emblems from mountain to shore, While through the sounding sky Loud rings the Nation's cry, — UNION AND LIBERTY ! ONE EVERMORE ! Light of our firmament, guide of our Nation, Pride of her children, and honored afar, Let the wide beams of thy full...
Page 43 - To establish similar schools for adult classes. 3. To form a class for instruction in the methods of teaching music, which may be composed of teachers, parents, and all other persons desirous to qualify themselves for teaching vocal music. 4. To form an association of choristers, and leading members of choirs, for the purpose of improvement in conducting and performing sacred music in churches. 5. To establish a...
Page 61 - It was side-splitting to hear the imitation of this brass band. . . . ... a firemen's parade with brass band came next. Naturally it was preceded by a violent ringing of firebells, and a rushing down a side street with the machine. When that noise died away, music from the open door of a dance hall was heard; with of course all its accompaniments — the rhythm of dancing feet, and the calling out of the figures. Then ... we passed by a church whence came the sound of organ music and the chanting...
Page 61 - ... Naturally it was preceded by a violent ringing of firebells, and a rushing down a side street with the machine. When that noise died away, music from the open door of a dance hall was heard; with of course all its accompaniments — the rhythm of dancing feet, and the calling out of the figures. Then ... we passed by a church whence came the sound of organ music and the chanting of a service by a number of voices. After that we heard in the distance a faint kind of Turkish patrol music; then...
Page 139 - The cadenza was sung without accompaniment; it covered two pages of music paper and was written in a style suited to an instrumental concerto. Towards the end there was a sequence of ascending and descending arpeggios of diminished sevenths which flowed into a scale of trills from a low note to one of her highest; then, dwelling very long on that note and trilling on it, she gradually, tranquilly, returned to the theme of the cavatina, when it was perceived that her wonderfully fine musical ear had...
Page 60 - Musician? describes Up Broadway: It was supposed to be a graphic tone-picture of sights and sounds seen and heard from Castle Garden to Union Square, which was at that time the boundary of New York's bustling life. This potpourri began with a musical picture of Castle Garden. . . . Moving up ... you next came to Barnum's Museum, with "Barnum's Band...
Page 46 - Webb,—an excellent general musician, but who had never heard the overture. He began by telling us that he had no score; so he stood up alongside of the first-violin desk and prepared to conduct. Rapping on the desk, he gave the signal to begin; out piped two flutes,—nothing else. He rapped again, implying that the players had not been ready to begin; then he said,
Page 43 - ... composed of teachers, parents, and all other persons desirous to qualify themselves for teaching vocal music. 4. To form an association of choristers, and leading members of choirs, for the purpose of improvement in conducting and performing sacred music in churches. 5. To establish a course of popular lectures on the nature and...
Page 46 - ... so he stood up alongside of the first-violin desk and prepared to conduct. Rapping on the desk, he gave the signal to begin; out piped two flutes, — nothing else. He rapped again, implying that the players had not been ready to begin; then he said, "We will try again." He gave the signal — and out piped the two flutes. That caused a little titter of surprise, and we all looked quizzically at each other. Mr. Webb, however, dutifully gave the signal for the next "hold" or chord, when two clarinets...
Page 261 - ... secure and retain public esteem. His energy, perseverance, integrity, and cordial manners, early gave him a high place in the community in which he has lived. By these qualities and habits he has been able to build up his fortune and establish his position in society. His popularity is not exhausted, and, as he is still in the prime of life, it is the hope of all who know him that his health may be spared for the higher duties in business and political life, to which his fellow-citizens are sure...

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