The poetical works of John Milton: with notes and a life of the author, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Hilliard, Gray, and Co., 1839
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User Review  - charlie68 - LibraryThing

John Milton is a poet who wrote in the 17th century. It was a time of great upheavel in England, and Milton was in the thick of it. I started this book in January read up to Paradise Lost and put it ... Read full review

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User Review  - the.ken.petersen - LibraryThing

I am exceedingly grateful to the media for their interest in Milton's 400th anniversary which, encouraged me to revisit the works of one of England's greatest authors. I find poetry quite difficult to ... Read full review

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Page 360 - CYRIACK, this three years' day these eyes, though clear, To outward view, of blemish or of spot, Bereft of light, their seeing have forgot; Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear Of sun, or moon, or star, throughout the year, Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope, but still bear up and steer Right onward.
Page 293 - With store of ladies, whose bright eyes Rain influence, and judge the prize Of wit or arms, while both contend To win her grace, whom all commend.
Page 283 - Spare Fast, that oft with Gods doth diet, And hears the Muses in a ring Aye round about Jove's altar sing : And add to these retired Leisure, That in trim gardens takes his pleasure ; 50 But, first and chiefest, with thee bring, Him that yon soars on golden wing, Guiding the fiery-wheeled throne, The Cherub Contemplation...
Page 271 - Bitter constraint and sad occasion dear Compels me to disturb your season due: For Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime, Young Lycidas, and hath not left his peer. Who would not sing for Lycidas? he knew 10 Himself to sing, and build the lofty rhyme. He must not float upon his watery bier Unwept, and welter to the parching wind Without the meed of some melodious tear.
Page 288 - HENCE, loathed Melancholy, Of Cerberus and blackest Midnight born In Stygian cave forlorn 'Mongst horrid shapes, and shrieks, and sights unholy! Find out some uncouth cell Where brooding Darkness spreads his jealous wings And the night-raven sings ; There under ebon shades, and low-brow'd rocks As ragged as thy locks, In dark Cimmerian desert ever dwell.
Page 64 - They, looking back, all the eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Waved over by that flaming brand; the gate With dreadful faces thronged and fiery arms. Some natural tears they dropped, but wiped them soon; The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide. They, hand in hand, with wandering steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.
Page 276 - Ah! who hath reft,' quoth he, 'my dearest pledge ? ' Last came and last did go, The pilot of the Galilean lake ; Two massy keys he bore, of metals twain no (The golden opes, the iron shuts amain). He shook his mitred locks, and stern bespake: ' How well could I have spared for thee young swain, Enow of such as for their bellies...
Page 283 - Sweet bird, that shunn'st the noise of folly, . Most musical, most melancholy! Thee, chauntress, oft the woods among I woo, to hear thy even-song; And, missing thee, I walk unseen 65 On the dry, smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide, pathless way, 70 And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.
Page 160 - To daily fraud, contempt, abuse and wrong, Within doors, or without, still as a fool, In power of others, never in my own ; Scarce half I seem to live, dead more than half. O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon, Irrecoverably dark, total eclipse Without all hope of day! O first created beam, and thou great Word, Let there be light, and light was over all; Why am I thus bereaved thy prime decree?
Page 274 - Alas ! what boots it with incessant care To tend the homely, slighted, shepherd's trade And strictly meditate the thankless Muse? Were it not better done, as others use, To sport with Amaryllis in the shade, Or with the tangles of Neaera's hair?

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