Lives of the Italian poets, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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E. Bull, 1831 - Poets, Italian
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Page 112 - ... wandered, but that it was not wholly lost: and if we consider for a moment the terrible trial he had to endure, disposed as he constitutionally was to melancholy, we shall see greater cause than ever to admire the original strength of his intellect, all the powers of which were, no doubt, instinctively and constantly combating with the terrors which assailed the very life and being of his spirit. He had been now for seven years a captive, and, during the best part of the time, had been confined...
Page 9 - Così avuto v' avessi o tomba, o fossa, Alla prima percossa ! Me dal sen della Madre empia Fortuna Pargoletto divelse : ah ! di que
Page 66 - Man, compounded of soul and body, and of a soul not simple, but divided into many and diverse powers. Jerusalem the strong city placed in a rough and hilly country, whereunto as to the last end are directed all the enterprises of the faithful army, doth here signify the civil happiness which may come to a Christian Man...
Page 31 - 1 bel sereno de la tua fronte a gli occhi miei s'offerse 45 e vidi armato spaziarvi Amore, se non che riverenza allor converse e meraviglia in fredda selce il seno, ivi peria con doppia morte il core.
Page 114 - Polacco came to visit me. I have been also served thus with other viands when no one has entered the prison, and with letters and books which were locked up in cases, but which I have found scattered about the floor in the morning, and others I have never found.
Page 363 - Mr. Ritchie is by far our best writer of romantic and imaginative tales," was the dictum of the Literary Gazette— and the Atlas pronounces him " the SCOTT of the short, picturesque, and bold story.
Page 150 - ... which honour, conferred alone on persons of high consideration, Tasso acknowledged with humility and gratitude, saying, "that this was the chariot upon which he hoped to go crowned, not with laurel as a poet into the capitol, but with glory as a saint to heaven.
Page 113 - ... only principle in our being that can prevent the imagination from gaining dominion over the reason. Tasso yielded himself a willing victim to his disordered fancy, and about the period at which we are arrived began...
Page 72 - ... render his poem as perfect as possible, and the laborious care with which men of genius in former days attended to the revision of their works." The manner in which a mind so delicate swayed from its bias, is a painful subject of contemplation. " No part of Tasso's life is more melancholy than the period at which we are now arrived. He was on the point of ushering into the world a work which was destined to crown him with the greenest laurels the Muse ever wore, and thus obtain a rich and ample...
Page 115 - ¡mage of the glorious Virgin with her Son in her arms, in the midst of a circle of colours and vapours ; wherefore, I ought not to despair of her grace. And although it is possible that this was a mere fantasm, as I am phrenetic, and am almost continually disturbed by various fantasies, and am filled with an infinite melancholy ; nevertheless, I am able, by the grace of God, to limit my assent, which, according to Cicero, is the work of a wise man ; I ought rather to believe, therefore,' that this...

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