The Heart of the Continent: A Record of Travel Across the Plains and in Oregon, with an Examination of the Mormon Principle (Google eBook)

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Hurd and Houghton, 1870 - Mormon Church - 568 pages
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Page 368 - The man who obtains ascendency over the mouths of the authorities cannot fail ere-long to get their ears. Brigham's manners astonish any one who knows that his only education was a few quarters of such common-school experience as could be had in Ontario County, Central New York, during the early part of the century. There are few courtlier men living. His address is a fine combination of dignity with the desire to confer happiness, — of perfect deference to the feelings of others with absolute...
Page 426 - We did not so much seem to be seeing from that crag of vision a new scene on the old familiar globe, as a new heaven and a new earth into which the creative spirit had just been breathed.
Page 568 - Alexander — and then Mormonism will go out of geography into the history of popular delusions. There is not a single chief, apostle, or bishop, except Brigham, who possesses any catholicity of influence. I found this tacitly acknowledged in every quarter. The people seem like citizens of a beleaguered town, who know they have but a definite amount of...
Page 367 - To return to it: his eyes are a clear blue -gray, frank and straightforward in their look ; his nose a finely chiselled aquiline ; his mouth exceedingly firm, and fortified in that expression by a chin almost as protrusive beyond the rest of the profile as Charlotte Cushman's, though less noticeably so, being longer than hers ; and he wears a narrow ribbon of brown beard, meeting under the chin. I think I have heard Captain Burton say that he had irregular teeth, which made his smile unpleasant Since...
Page 367 - Mr. Fuller, who, besides being a successful politician, was an excellent dentist. He secured Brigham's everlasting gratitude by making him a very handsome false set, and performing the same service for all of his favorite, but edentate wives. Several other apostles of the Lord owe to Mr. Fuller their ability to gnash their teeth against the Gentiles. The result was that he became the most popular Federal officer (who did n't turn Mormon) ever sent to Utah. The man who obtains ascendency over the...
Page 347 - What d' ye think o' that ? Shall ! Shall take a hold on him ! That don't mean they sha'n't, does it ? No ! God's word means what it says. And therefore means no otherwise, — not in no way, shape, nor manner. Not in no way, for He saith, ' I am the way — and the truth and the life.
Page 370 - But you don't know yet," he added, "how independent we are of you at the East. Where do you think we got that central chandelier, and how much d'ye suppose we paid for it?
Page 566 - ... one man's irresponsible hands is a crime against the Constitution. At the same time, this power, wonderful as it may seem, is practically wielded for the common good. I never heard Brigham's worst enemies accuse him of peculation, though such immense interests are controlled by his one pair of hands. His life is all one great theoretical mistake, yet he makes fewer practical mistakes than any other man, so situated, whom the world ever saw. Those he does make are not on the side of self. He merges...
Page 366 - Let us return to where he stands gazing down on the parquet. Like any Eastern partygoer, he is habited in the "customary suit of solemn black," and looks very distinguished in this dress, though his daily homespun detracts nothing from the feeling, when in his presence, that you are beholding a most remarkable man. He is nearly seventy years old, but appears very little over forty. His height is about five feet ten inches ; his figure very well made and slightly inclining to portliness. His hair...
Page 366 - But they were very polite, and received me with as skilfully veiled disapprobation as is shown by fashionable Eastern belles to brilliant seducers immoral in our sense. Had I been a •woman, I suppose there would have been no mercy for me. I sought out our entertainer, Brigham Young, to thank him for the flattering exception made in our Gentile favor. He was standing in the dress-circle of the theatre, looking down on the dancers with an air of mingled hearty kindness and feudal ownership. I could...

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