Berryman's Shakespeare: Essays, Letters and Other Writings

Front Cover
Tauris Parke Paperbacks, 2001 - Dramatists, English - 401 pages
6 Reviews
Extensive writings on the subject of Shakespeare by one of America's most influential modern poets. Berryman devoted a lifetime of writing to the canon of Shakespeare's work, a collection of which is presented here, edited by John Haffendon.
  

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Review: Berryman's Shakespeare: Essays, Letters, and Other Writings

User Review  - Alan Lindsay - Goodreads

One of the most thoughtful treatments of Shakespeare I've read. Aside from the embrace of Freudiansm vis-a-vis Hamlet, I have had no problems with this treatment. And even thought was thoughtful ... Read full review

Review: Berryman's Shakespeare: Essays, Letters, and Other Writings

User Review  - Goodreads

One of the most thoughtful treatments of Shakespeare I've read. Aside from the embrace of Freudiansm vis-a-vis Hamlet, I have had no problems with this treatment. And even thought was thoughtful ... Read full review

Contents

Preface by Robert Giroux
ix
Shakespeares Early Comedy
3
Shakespeare at Thirty
31
Pathos and Dream
50
The World of Action
65
Alls Well
81
The Crisis
100
The Tragic Substance
120
The Conceiving of King Lear
220
Letters on Lear
226
William Houghton William Haughton The Shrew
257
The Sonnets
285
The Comedy of Errors
292
Henry VI
308
The Two Gentlemen of Verona
314
2 Henry IV
335

The End
137
An Edition of King Lear
173
Textual Introduction
179
Staging
212
Shakespeares Reality
343
Notes
355
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

John Berryman's poetry has a depth and obscurity that discourages many readers while it entices critics. His major work, The Dream Songs (1969), forms a poetic notebook that captures the ephemera of mood and attitude of this most mercurial of poets. Born John Smith in McAlester, Oklahoma, in 1914 and educated at Columbia University and Clare College, Cambridge, he later taught at several universities. Berryman received the Shelley Memorial Award (1948), the Harriet Monroe Award (1957), the Loines Award for poetry of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1964), and the fellowship of the Academy of American Poets (1966). In 1964 he won the Pulitzer Prize in poetry for 77 Dream Songs (1964). His short story "The Imaginary Jew" received the Kenyon-Doubleday Award and was listed in Best American Short Stories, (1946). He also wrote Stephen Crane (1950) and is the author of a novel, Recovery (1973). Often listed along with Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton as a major confessional poet, he was as much concerned with literary artifice as he was with personal revelation. His works include The Freedom of the Poet, Henry's Fate & Other Poems, 1967-1972, Collected Poems 1937-1971, Berryman's Shakespeare, and Selected Poems. Berryman committed suicide in 1972.

John Haffenden is a professor of English literature at the University of Sheffield. His publications include The Life of John Berryman, Viewpoints: Poets in Conversation, and a study of poet and critic William Empson.

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