The British Bibliographer, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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R. Triphook, 1814 - English literature
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Page 17 - The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye, As the perfumed tincture of the roses ; Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses ; But, for their virtue* only is their show, They live unwoo'd, and unrespected fade ; Die to themselves. Sweet roses do not so ; Of their sweet deaths are sweetest odours made : And so of you, beauteous and lovely youth, When that shall fade, my verse distils your truth.
Page 294 - Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father: 5. To whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.
Page 16 - The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem For that sweet odour which doth in it live. The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses : But, for their virtue only is their show, They live unwoo'd and unrespected fade ; Die to themselves.
Page 17 - ... sweet odour which doth in it live. The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses : But, for their virtue only is their show, They live unwoo'd and unrespected fade, Die to themselves. Sweet roses do not so ; Of their sweet deaths are sweetest odours made : And so of you, beauteous and lovely youth, When that shall fade, my verse distils your truth.
Page 36 - Prince of Men, Henry Prince of Wales, &c. With The Funeralls, and Representation of the Herse of the same High and mighty Prince ; Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornewaile and Rothsay, Count Palatine of Chester, Earle of Carick, and late Knight of the most Noble Order of the Garter. Which Noble Prince deceased at St. James, the sixt day of Nouember, 1612.
Page 235 - Sure your ancestors contrived your narrow streets in the days of wheel-barrows, before those greater engines, carts, were invented. Is your climate so hot, that as you walk you need umbrellas of tiles to intercept the sun ? Or are your shambles so empty that you are afraid to take in fresh air, lest it should sharpen your stomachs ? Oh, the goodly...
Page 130 - Desir'd the Realme to rule it as they wolde. Their former loue and friendship waxed cold, Their husbands rebels voyde of reason quite Rose vp, rebeld, bereft his crowne and right : 17. Caus'd him agree they might in parts equall Deuide the Realme, and promist him a gard Of sixty Knights on him attending still at call. But in six monthes such was his hap to hard, That Gonerell of his retinue barde The halfe of them, shee and her husband reft.
Page 235 - Street, which, had it not had the ill luck to be crooked, was narrow enough to have been your founder's perspective ! And where the garrets, (perhaps not for want of architecture, but through abundance of amity) are so made, that opposite neighbours may shake hands without stirring from home.
Page 128 - I will (said I) at once my loue declare and tell: I loude you euer as my father well, No otherwise, if more to know you craue : We loue you chiefly for the goodes you haue. Thus much I said, the more their flattery to detect...
Page 70 - ... Locrinus wife : [165] But oft they say the thirde doth ende the strife, Which I haue proude : therefore the sequel vewe The thirde payes home, this prouerbe is to true. This kinge could not refraine his former minde, But vsde me still, and I my doubtfull yeares [170] Did linger on, I knew no shift to finde, But past the time full oft with mourning teares. A concubine is. neuer voyde of feares, For if the wyfe her at aduauntage take : In radge reuenge with death she seekes to make. [175] Likewise...

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